Baseball Player Won-Loss Records
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The 1973 Season as seen through the Prism of Player Won-Lost Records



Next in my continuing series of looking at individual seasons through the prism of Player won-lost records is the 1973 season.

The Best of 1973

I calculate Player won-lost records two ways: pWins, which tie to team wins and eWins, which control for context and the ability of one's teammates. For players with more pWins than eWins, their Player wins contributed to more team wins than one might expect; for players with more eWins than pWins, just the opposite is true: their Player wins translated into fewer team wins than expected. Or more briefly: a player with more pWins than eWins was better in context, a player with more eWins than pWins was worse in context.

The top 10 players in pWins above Positional Average and Replacement Level were as follows.

pWins over Positional Average
Top 10 Players
          pWins over Replacement Level
Top 10 Players
Player pWins pLosses pWOPA pWORL           Player pWins pLosses pWOPA pWORL
1Joe L. Morgan26.116.45.0
6.8
1Joe L. Morgan26.116.45.0
6.8
2Tom Seaver20.314.04.0
5.4
2Nolan Ryan23.015.93.8
5.6
3Nolan Ryan23.015.93.8
5.6
3Tom Seaver20.314.04.0
5.4
4Don Sutton20.214.53.7
5.1
4Reggie Jackson24.016.43.4
5.2
5Jim Palmer18.311.53.6
5.0
5Don Sutton20.214.53.7
5.1
6Reggie Jackson24.016.43.4
5.2
6Jim Palmer18.311.53.6
5.0
7John Hiller12.55.23.3
4.4
7Bobby Bonds27.119.73.0
4.9
8Bobby Bonds27.119.73.0
4.9
8Willie Stargell25.217.52.9
4.7
9Willie Stargell25.217.52.9
4.7
9John Hiller12.55.23.3
4.4
10Johnny Bench19.814.42.8
4.3
10Bert Blyleven19.114.12.8
4.3


The top 10 players in eWins above Positional Average and Replacement Level were as follows.

eWins over Positional Average
Top 10 Players
          eWins over Replacement Level
Top 10 Players
Player eWins eLosses eWOPA eWORL           Player eWins eLosses eWOPA eWORL
1Joe L. Morgan23.916.63.8
5.5
1Joe L. Morgan23.916.63.8
5.5
2Bert Blyleven20.013.73.4
4.9
2Darrell Evans24.616.53.4
5.1
3Darrell Evans24.616.53.4
5.1
3Bert Blyleven20.013.73.4
4.9
4Tom Seaver19.414.63.3
4.6
4Bobby Bonds27.320.42.8
4.8
5Nolan Ryan20.915.52.9
4.6
5Tom Seaver19.414.63.3
4.6
6Bobby Bonds27.320.42.8
4.8
6Nolan Ryan20.915.52.9
4.6
7Willie Stargell22.916.12.6
4.2
7Willie Stargell22.916.12.6
4.2
8Bobby Grich20.516.12.5
4.1
8Reggie Jackson22.016.42.5
4.1
9Reggie Jackson22.016.42.5
4.1
9Bobby Grich20.516.12.5
4.1
10Don Sutton16.713.22.5
3.7
10Davey Johnson21.917.32.4
4.0


The top player in 1973, according to Player won-lost records, was Joe Morgan, who was in the midst of the best six-year run in Player won-lost records (as measured by pWORL) of any player for whom I have calculated Player won-lost records. The lists above are also filled with several other of the "usual suspects" from the 1970s: Tom Seaver, Jim Palmer, Reggie Jackson.

In addition to the "usual suspects", however, 1973 was the best season in the careers of three players who are worth a bit closer look: two sabermetric darlings and a player considered vastly overrated by many sabermetric observers.
Darrell Evans
In The New Bill James Historical Abstract, Bill James posited that Darrell Evans was "the most underrated player in baseball history". Evans's 1973 season may be the best example of this. The 1973 season was Darrell Evans's best season, measured by eWins over either positional average or replacement level (although I actually find his 1974 season was actually slightly better in context). As shown above, Evans was arguably the second-best player in the National League in 1973.

And it's not like Player won-lost records are finding something completely hidden from view in traditional statistics. Evans hit 41 home runs, he scored and drove in 100 runs (114 and 104, respectively). He had an on-base percentage over .400 (.403), an OPS over .950 (.959), and led the major leagues with 124 walks. He was 2nd in the NL in times on base, 3rd in total bases. I'm not saying these were all statistics that were widely known and appreciated in 1973; I'm just pointing out that the offensive things that Darrell Evans was good at are fairly obvious things.

Fielding is still a much tougher thing to measure and was all but impossible to evaluate in 1973. Even so, Evans had an above-average fielding percentage and led the National League in range factor per game at third base (a stat which, as crude and "old-school" as it seems today, didn't actually exist in 1973). But I would think that contemporary observers should have at least been able to tell that Darrell Evans was apparently playing a respectable third base in 1973.

Evans did make the All-Star team in 1973 - one of only two such appearances in his 21-year career. And he got MVP votes for the first of only four times in his career. But he finished 18th in NL MVP voting, finishing between Felix Millan and Lee May. No offense to Millan or May, who were very good baseball players in their prime, but the idea that they were comparable in value to Darrell Evans in 1973 is silly.

The next table shows Darrell Evans' career record as measured by Player won-lost records.

Darrell Evans
Basic Player Won-Lost Records
Value Decomposition
Season Team Age Games pWins pLosses pWin Pct. pWOPA pWORL eWins eLosses eWin Pct. eWOPA eWORL
1969ATL22
12
0.40.80.335-0.2
-0.1
0.40.80.340-0.2-0.1
1970ATL23
12
1.21.80.386-0.4
-0.3
1.41.20.5300.00.1
1971ATL24
88
9.37.40.5550.7
1.4
9.48.00.5410.51.2
1972ATL25
125
16.313.80.5421.1
2.3
16.713.90.5461.22.5
1973ATL26
161
21.516.50.5671.9
3.5
24.616.50.5993.45.1
1974ATL27
160
23.217.10.5752.7
4.2
21.317.10.5551.83.2
1975ATL28
156
20.418.50.5240.6
2.2
20.718.30.5310.92.5
29
135
12.111.30.516-0.2
0.7
11.711.10.513-0.20.6
1977SFN30
144
16.414.90.5230.2
1.5
15.714.10.5280.41.6
1978SFN31
159
20.417.50.5381.1
2.5
19.216.90.5330.82.2
1979SFN32
160
19.117.70.5200.4
1.8
19.218.00.5160.21.7
1980SFN33
154
20.618.70.5240.6
2.1
19.617.60.5260.62.1
1981SFN34
101
11.69.80.5420.6
1.5
12.110.10.5440.71.6
1982SFN35
141
15.112.90.5390.8
1.8
15.613.50.5360.71.8
1983SFN36
142
18.314.50.5581.3
2.5
17.713.50.5681.62.7
1984DET37
131
11.110.00.5270.3
1.4
10.99.70.5310.41.4
1985DET38
151
16.312.50.5671.5
2.7
16.312.80.5601.32.5
1986DET39
151
16.111.90.5751.7
2.9
14.312.20.5410.71.9
1987DET40
150
15.611.10.5851.7
3.0
15.312.40.5510.92.1
1988DET41
144
10.810.50.507-0.1
0.9
11.110.60.5120.01.1
1989ATL42
106
7.39.10.445-1.2
-0.6
7.78.30.483-0.60.0
------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------
CAREER (reg. season)
2,683
302.9258.20.54015.2
38.1
300.8256.50.54015.137.8
------ ------ ------ ------ ------
PostSeason (career)
13
1.11.20.466 -0.01.21.40.464 -0.0
------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------
COMBINED
2,696
304.0259.40.540
38.1
302.0257.80.540 37.8


Bert Blyleven
For many, many years, Bert Blyleven was the poster boy for sabermetrics. There were probably thousands of articles written in support of his Hall-of-Fame candidacy, which utlimately ended in victory when he was elected to the Hall of Fame in 2011 in his 14th year on the ballot.

Like Evans, 1973 was the finest season of Bert Blyleven's career, and the fineness of his season was obvious without resorting to advanced sabermetrics. In 1973, Bert Blyleven finished 4th in the AL in innings pitched (with 325 - lots of pitchers pitched crazy numbers of innings around this time), 3rd in complete games (with 25), led the AL in shutouts (9), was 2nd in strikeouts (258), 3rd in K/9, 2nd in lowest BB/9. He was 2nd in the AL in ERA (and 1st in ballpark-adjusted ERA+) and also 2nd in WHIP. He led the American League in K/BB ratio (admittedly, we've moved closer to "advanced sabermetrics" here).

Blyleven's team, the Minnesota Twins were not a terrible team. They finished at exactly 0.500 (81-81) and tied for 4th in the American League in runs scored. Yet, despite all of that, Bert Blyleven, for all his impressive pitching stats, was able to pick up "only" 20 pitcher wins, 7th in the American League, and was charged with 17 pitcher losses, 5th in the AL.

This perfectly encapsulates the Hall-of-Fame argument against Bert Blyleven, that he didn't win as many games as he should have, the he "pitched just well enough to lose". In 1973, there's some slight merit to this argument. The next table shows Bert Blyleven's 1973 season in and out of context.

Games pWins pLosses pWin Pct. pWOPA pWORL eWins eLosses eWin Pct. eWOPA eWORL
Bert Blyleven
40
19.114.10.5762.8
4.3
20.013.70.5933.44.9


Blyeleven's pWins totals were a bit lower than his expected wins (eWins). But, honestly, the difference is not that great, and even in context, Bert Blyleven's 1973 season was excellent.

Exactly like Evans, 1973 was one of two seasons in which Bert Blyleven was named to the All-Star team and one of four seasons in which he received major award votes. Even with that, however, like Evans, his finish in major-award voting was disappointing to say the least: 7th in Cy Young voting and 26th in MVP voting.

The career record of Bert Blyleven as measured by Player won-lost records is presented next. I would note that Bert Blyleven, over the course of his 22-year career, contributed almost exactly as many actual wins to his teams, in context, 295.7 pWins, as expected wins, 301.2 eWins, and, in fact, actually had slightly more career pWOPA than eWOPA.

Bert Blyleven
Basic Player Won-Lost Records
Value Decomposition
Season Team Age Games pWins pLosses pWin Pct. pWOPA pWORL eWins eLosses eWin Pct. eWOPA eWORL
1970MIN19
27
10.510.50.4990.3
1.2
10.29.70.5140.61.5
1971MIN20
38
18.315.80.5361.9
3.5
17.916.20.5251.63.1
1972MIN21
39
18.116.80.5191.4
2.9
18.417.80.5081.12.7
1973MIN22
40
19.114.10.5762.8
4.3
20.013.70.5933.44.9
1974MIN23
37
16.412.90.5592.0
3.3
17.213.30.5642.23.6
1975MIN24
35
15.312.10.5581.7
3.0
17.013.90.5511.73.2
25
36
18.414.90.5521.9
3.4
17.814.80.5461.63.1
1977TEX26
30
13.810.90.5571.6
2.8
14.510.90.5712.03.3
1978PIT27
37
15.613.60.5331.5
2.8
15.514.00.5251.32.6
1979PIT28
38
13.612.60.5181.1
2.1
13.915.90.466-0.30.9
1980PIT29
37
11.813.10.474-0.2
0.8
12.313.30.481-0.11.0
1981CLE30
20
8.36.90.5440.8
1.6
9.77.70.5581.22.1
1982CLE31
4
1.31.60.445-0.1
0.0
1.21.20.5030.00.1
1983CLE32
24
9.18.60.5140.4
1.2
9.68.10.5420.91.7
1984CLE33
33
14.39.30.6052.7
3.7
14.410.80.5722.03.1
34
37
17.615.10.5381.5
3.3
17.713.20.5732.54.2
1986MIN35
36
17.717.00.5100.6
2.3
16.516.40.5010.31.9
1987MIN36
37
17.116.00.5160.9
2.6
16.117.60.478-0.41.3
1988MIN37
33
11.314.50.439-1.4
-0.2
12.013.20.475-0.50.7
1989CAL38
33
14.09.40.5982.5
3.6
14.111.20.5571.62.9
1990CAL39
23
7.18.40.457-0.5
0.2
7.88.50.478-0.20.6
1992CAL41
25
7.39.70.430-1.0
-0.1
7.38.70.457-0.50.3
------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------
CAREER (reg. season)
699
295.7264.00.52822.3
48.3
301.2270.20.52722.148.6
------ ------ ------ ------ ------
PostSeason (career)
8
3.32.10.611 0.92.92.60.525 0.5
------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------
COMBINED
707
299.0266.10.528
49.3
304.1272.80.527 49.1


Nolan Ryan
Nolan Ryan is something of the mirror image of Bert Blyleven. Ryan had a slightly lower career winning percentage than Blyleven (.534 to .526) and the same number of career pitcher wins as Don Sutton (324). Yet, while it took Blyleven 14 years and Don Sutton 5 years to make the Hall, Nolan Ryan was elected to the Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility with 491 of 497 (98.8%) votes. Ryan had a higher percentage of HOF votes than Willie Mays (94.7% in 1979), Hank Aaron (97.8% in 1982), Warren Spahn (83.2% in 1973), Jim Palmer (92.6% in 1990), Cal Ripken (98.5% in 2007), Rickey Henderson (94.8% in 2009), and, in fact, every other player ever except for Tom Seaver. Ryan received more votes than any other pitcher in voting for the MLB All Century Team.

Nolan Ryan's greatness is summarized in two numbers: 5,714 strikeouts and 7 no-hitters in his career. The sabermetric argument against him is perhaps best summarized in one other number: 2,795 career walks.

Ryan was frequently used as a foil for pro-Blyleven arguments, suggesting that Blyleven was a better pitcher than even the great Nolan Ryan, in large part because his career walk rate was about half as large as Ryan's. The 1973 season was the best year in the careers of both Blyleven and Ryan. Ryan set a major-league record with 383 strikeouts and threw the first two no-hitters of his career that season. He also finished second in voting for the AL Cy Young Award behind Jim Palmer. Yet, controlling for context, Blyleven beat Ryan in eWins over positional average and replacement level.

Nolan Ryan's career as measured by Player won-lost records is presented in the next table. By Player won-lost records, Ryan had a somewhat more valuable career than Bert Blyleven, although Blyleven nevertheless had an excellent career, highly worthy of the Hall of Fame.

Nolan Ryan
Basic Player Won-Lost Records
Value Decomposition
Season Team Age Games pWins pLosses pWin Pct. pWOPA pWORL eWins eLosses eWin Pct. eWOPA eWORL
1966NYN19
2
0.10.50.198-0.2
-0.1
0.20.40.303-0.1-0.1
1968NYN21
21
7.810.10.436-0.8
-0.1
7.810.10.437-0.8-0.1
1969NYN22
25
5.25.00.5110.2
0.8
5.14.80.5140.30.8
1970NYN23
27
8.711.30.437-0.9
-0.1
8.19.10.471-0.20.5
1971NYN24
30
11.615.00.436-1.2
0.0
9.412.20.437-1.00.0
1972CAL25
39
21.620.30.5161.5
3.4
18.617.10.5211.53.1
1973CAL26
41
23.015.90.5913.8
5.6
20.915.50.5732.94.6
1974CAL27
42
22.218.90.5402.0
3.8
20.817.20.5482.13.8
1975CAL28
28
13.112.40.5120.4
1.7
12.112.00.5030.21.3
1976CAL29
39
20.518.20.5301.3
3.1
17.715.20.5371.42.8
1977CAL30
37
20.316.90.5462.0
3.9
19.315.50.5532.13.9
1978CAL31
31
15.613.40.5371.2
2.5
15.213.60.5270.92.2
1979CAL32
34
16.213.70.5421.5
2.8
14.211.30.5571.62.8
1980HOU33
35
15.114.10.5181.1
2.2
14.114.10.5020.61.7
1981HOU34
21
10.97.80.5842.1
2.9
9.77.40.5661.62.4
1982HOU35
35
16.616.20.5071.0
2.4
15.016.50.4770.01.3
1983HOU36
29
13.211.80.5271.3
2.3
12.211.40.5161.01.9
1984HOU37
30
11.913.00.4780.1
1.1
10.910.90.5000.61.4
1985HOU38
35
14.013.80.5030.7
2.1
13.713.80.4990.61.9
1986HOU39
30
12.412.00.5080.8
1.9
10.710.70.5020.61.5
1987HOU40
34
13.514.10.4900.5
1.8
13.611.20.5481.93.0
1988HOU41
33
14.115.30.479-0.0
1.3
13.314.70.474-0.11.1
1989TEX42
32
16.111.50.5832.5
3.9
15.012.10.5551.73.0
1990TEX43
30
12.210.10.5471.3
2.4
12.79.60.5691.82.8
1991TEX44
27
10.77.90.5741.5
2.4
11.17.10.6082.13.0
1992TEX45
27
9.49.30.5030.2
1.2
9.78.60.5300.71.7
1993TEX46
13
3.84.70.447-0.4
-0.0
3.93.90.495-0.00.4
------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------
CAREER (reg. season)
807
359.9333.10.51923.5
54.9
335.1306.10.52323.852.9
------ ------ ------ ------ ------
PostSeason (career)
9
2.72.60.513 0.43.72.60.588 0.9
------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------
COMBINED
816
362.6335.70.519
55.4
338.7308.70.523 53.9


1973 Postseason

I was four months old when the last World Series was played before the two leagues were split into divisions. So I have no personal recollection of the debates that surely arose over adding League Championship Series. But surely somebody, somewhere, complained that this would lead to some undeserving team who lucked into winning a weak division eventually making it to the World Series.

For the first three years of the divisional era, the team with the better record won every League Championship Series. Finally, in 1972, the winner of the NLCS had finished 0.5 game back of the team they beat. But that's not too bad.

The 1973 postseason was when the anti-division folks' worst fear came true. In the American League, the 94-win Oakland A's beat the 97-win Baltimore Orioles. Okay, fair enough: 94 wins isn't too bad and the A's were the defending World Champs. But in the National League, the 82-win New York Mets, with the 4th-best record in the league, somehow managed to beat the 99-win Cincinnati Reds 3 games to 2. And then they took the 94-win defending World Champion A's to 7 games in the World Series.

Still, it made for great entertainment. The best performers of the 1973 postseason, as measured by pWins over replacement level, are shown next.

1973 Postseason: Total
pWins pLosses pWORL
Bert CampanerisOAK2.41.40.8
Catfish HunterOAK2.21.00.8
Rusty StaubNYN2.01.00.6
Ken HoltzmanOAK1.81.10.5


Top postseason players by round were as follows.

1973 Postseason: World Series
pWins pLosses pWORL
Bert CampanerisOAK1.30.80.4
Tug McGrawNYN1.10.50.3
Rollie FingersOAK1.20.80.3
Catfish HunterOAK0.80.40.3
Jerry KoosmanNYN0.60.40.2
Joe RudiOAK1.10.80.2
Reggie JacksonOAK1.10.90.2
Ken HoltzmanOAK1.10.90.2
Rusty StaubNYN0.90.70.2

1973 Postseason: League Championship Series
pWins pLosses pWORL
Catfish HunterOAK1.40.50.5
Rusty StaubNYN1.10.30.4
Jon MatlackNYN1.00.30.4
Jim PalmerBAL1.00.40.4
Bert CampanerisOAK1.10.60.4
Ken HoltzmanOAK0.70.20.3
Johnny BenchCIN0.90.40.3
Pete Rose Sr.CIN1.10.70.3


Best of 1973 by Factor and Position

Next, let's look at the top players in (context-neutral, teammate-adjusted) eWins over Positional Average in various aspects of the game.
Best by Factor: Batting, Baserunning, Pitching, Fielding
There are four basic factors for which players earn Player won-lost records: Batting, Baserunning, Pitching, and Fielding. The top players in 1973 in eWOPA by factor were as follows.

Batting
eWins eLosses eWOPA
Darrell Evans17.711.23.0
Willie Stargell15.69.22.9

Positional Average excludes pitcher offense



Baserunning
eWins eLosses eWOPA
Lou Brock3.41.80.7
Bert Campaneris2.61.30.7

Positional Average excludes pitcher offense



Pitching
eWins eLosses Net Wins
Bert Blyleven17.713.34.4
Nolan Ryan18.714.93.8
Tom Seaver15.812.23.5


Fielding, P
eWins eLosses Net Wins
Ray Burris0.40.10.3
Tommy John0.50.20.3
Jim Colborn0.60.30.3


Fielding, C
eWins eLosses Net Wins
Bob Boone2.31.80.5


Fielding, 1B
eWins eLosses Net Wins
George C. Scott2.82.30.5


Fielding, 2B
eWins eLosses Net Wins
Bobby Grich5.84.21.6


Fielding, 3B
eWins eLosses Net Wins
Brooks Robinson4.53.41.1


Fielding, SS
eWins eLosses Net Wins
Mark Belanger6.04.41.6


The best defensive second baseman, third baseman, and shortstop in the major leagues in 1973 were all members of the Baltimore Orioles.

Fielding, LF
eWins eLosses Net Wins
Tom Grieve3.00.62.4


Fielding, CF
eWins eLosses Net Wins
Johnny Grubb4.63.70.8


Fielding, RF
eWins eLosses Net Wins
Johnny Callison2.21.01.2


Best by Position
Next, we look at 1973 Major-League leaders in eWOPA by position. The figures shown here only include Player decisions earned while playing this particular position, and include no contextual adjustments (expected or actual).



Catcher
eWins eLosses eWOPA
Thurman Munson15.012.21.8


First Base
eWins eLosses eWOPA
John Mayberry Sr.17.113.11.5


Second Base
eWins eLosses eWOPA
Joe L. Morgan23.217.03.2


Third Base
eWins eLosses eWOPA
Darrell Evans22.715.33.1


Shortstop
eWins eLosses eWOPA
Bert Campaneris18.618.31.5


Left Field
eWins eLosses eWOPA
Willie Stargell22.416.22.2


Center Field
eWins eLosses eWOPA
Cesar Cedeno21.516.41.9


Right Field
eWins eLosses eWOPA
Bobby Bonds26.720.52.4


Starting Pitcher
eWins eLosses eWOPA
Bert Blyleven17.913.72.3
Tom Seaver16.312.42.2
Nolan Ryan18.715.12.1


Relief Pitcher
eWins eLosses eWOPA
John Hiller7.44.91.0
Bob Reynolds6.13.81.0


For relief pitchers, context-neutral records may not be the best measure of how good they are, as context can matter a great deal, depending on how a pitcher is used. Here are the top relief pitchers of 1973 in context, in terms of pWins and pWOPA.

Top Relief Pitchers of 1973, based on pWORL
Player pWins pLosses pWin Pct. pWOPA pWORL
John Hiller12.55.20.7053.34.4
Mike G. Marshall12.29.60.5601.12.5
Elias Sosa7.94.80.6221.42.2
Cy Acosta7.54.30.6331.42.1
Terry Forster12.410.50.5400.82.1


John Hiller had an outstanding 1973 season. In fact, it was the best season ever by a pitcher who did not start a game, as measured by pWins over replacement level. The top five such seasons are shown in the next table.

Player Season Team pWins pLosses pWin Pct. pWOPA pWORL
John Hiller1973DET12.55.20.7053.34.4
Dan Quisenberry1980KCA12.56.00.6763.04.2
Keith Foulke2000CHA9.32.90.7643.03.9
John Smoltz2002ATL10.03.90.7212.83.9
Willie Hernandez1984DET9.83.10.7593.03.9


A new table appears for the first time in 1973, the first year for the designated hitter in the American League.

Designated Hitter
eWins eLosses eWOPA
Frank Robinson12.69.71.5


Ron Blomberg became the first designated hitter in major-league history on April 6, 1973. Frank Robinson became the first player to lead the major-leagues in eWins over positional average at the DH position.

Finally, here are the best at three oft-forgotten positions that can nevertheless matter: pitcher offense, pinch hitting, and pinch running.

Pitcher Offense
eWins eLosses eWOPA
Ken Brett1.81.50.7


Pinch Hitter
eWins eLosses eWOPA
Phil Gagliano1.40.70.3
Jerry Morales0.90.40.3


Pinch Runner
eWins eLosses eWOPA
Matt Alexander0.20.00.1
Ken Brett0.10.10.1


Noteworthy Players of 1973

Finally, let's take a look at some players who had noteworthy 1973 seasons.

Notable Debuts
Two players made their major-league debut in 1973 who have been elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame: Dave Winfield and George Brett.

Dave Winfield George Brett
Season Games pWins pLoss Win Pct. pWOPA pWORL Games pWins pLoss Win Pct. pWOPA pWORL
1973564.24.60.480-0.3
0.1
130.61.00.383-0.2-0.1
197414518.616.40.5310.5
1.9
13312.613.90.475-0.70.3
197514320.417.40.5390.8
2.3
15920.717.40.5431.63.2
197613722.017.20.5611.8
3.3
15922.417.10.5682.64.1
197715723.721.30.5270.2
2.0
13921.215.60.5762.74.2
197815824.918.90.5692.3
4.0
12816.613.90.5431.22.4
197915926.820.10.5712.2
4.1
15421.216.50.5622.33.7
198016221.020.60.504-0.5
1.1
11718.510.30.6424.15.2
198110514.412.90.5280.5
1.6
8910.510.20.5070.00.8
198214020.018.80.5150.2
1.7
14418.315.00.5491.52.8
198315221.318.80.5310.9
2.4
12317.013.90.5501.42.5
198414120.817.20.5471.2
2.7
10415.111.30.5722.03.0
198515523.718.50.5622.3
3.9
15522.015.60.5863.34.7
198615420.117.70.5320.9
2.3
12315.813.20.5451.22.3
198715620.417.90.5340.9
2.4
11512.611.80.515-0.10.9
198814921.717.10.5591.8
3.2
15718.315.10.5481.12.5
1989
 
12414.612.30.5420.51.5
199013215.816.40.491-0.5
0.7
14215.613.70.5320.51.7
199115017.517.10.505-0.2
1.3
13111.111.10.500-0.40.9
199215617.612.90.5762.0
3.7
15211.412.20.484-0.70.6
199314312.814.50.469-1.0
0.4
14512.112.40.495-0.31.2
1994766.26.10.502-0.2
0.6
1995451.42.40.363-0.6
-0.3
------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------
CAREER RECORDS2,971395.2344.70.53415.0
45.1
2,706328.1273.60.54523.548.5


Last Hurrahs
Finally, 1973 was the final season for two members of the Baseball Hall of Fame: 1951 NL Rookie-of-the-Year Willie Mays and 1956 AL Rookie-of-the-Year Luis Aparicio.

Willie Mays Luis Aparicio
Season Games pWins pLoss Win Pct. pWOPA pWORL Games pWins pLoss Win Pct. pWOPA pWORL
195112115.213.40.5320.6
1.8
1952345.43.30.6251.0
1.3
1953
 
195415123.917.00.5842.5
4.3
195515227.117.70.6053.9
5.7
195615223.218.30.5591.7
3.4
15216.317.00.4900.11.5
195715224.418.50.5692.2
4.0
14317.515.90.5241.12.5
195815226.118.30.5883.1
4.9
14516.816.20.5100.82.1
195915124.916.30.6053.7
5.4
15219.518.30.5170.92.4
196015325.419.50.5662.1
3.9
15320.317.90.5311.63.1
196115425.917.60.5953.4
5.4
15618.618.40.5020.72.3
196216229.618.30.6185.0
6.8
15316.618.30.476-0.40.9
196315724.719.30.5612.1
3.8
14618.619.30.4910.21.6
196415726.116.40.6134.3
6.1
14620.416.70.5501.93.4
196515726.217.80.5943.4
5.2
14417.716.30.5221.22.6
196615225.816.40.6124.0
5.6
15119.518.30.5151.12.6
196714117.714.70.5471.0
2.5
13414.517.20.457-0.60.8
196814823.817.20.5802.6
4.3
15720.019.60.5061.22.8
196911714.712.80.5360.6
1.8
15620.121.20.4870.11.9
197013916.914.50.5380.7
2.1
14618.018.30.4960.52.1
197113618.111.90.6032.5
3.8
12514.315.20.4860.41.5
1972889.77.90.5510.6
1.3
11013.412.30.5211.12.1
1973666.26.50.487-0.4
0.1
13215.515.80.4951.02.3
------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------
CAREER RECORDS2,992461.0333.60.58050.7
83.5
2,601317.6312.10.50412.738.6




All articles are written so that they pull data directly from the most recent version of the Player won-lost database. Hence, any numbers cited within these articles should automatically incorporate the most recent update to Player won-lost records. In some cases, however, the accompanying text may have been written based on previous versions of Player won-lost records. I apologize if this results in non-sensical text in any cases.

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