Baseball Player Won-Loss Records
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The 1993 Season as seen through the Prism of Player Won-Lost Records



Next in my continuing series of looking at individual seasons through the prism of Player won-lost records is the 1993 season.

The Best of 1993

I calculate Player won-lost records two ways: pWins, which tie to team wins and eWins, which control for context and the ability of one's teammates. For players with more pWins than eWins, their Player wins contributed to more team wins than one might expect; for players with more eWins than pWins, just the opposite is true: their Player wins translated into fewer team wins than expected. Or more briefly: a player with more pWins than eWins was better in context, a player with more eWins than pWins was worse in context.

The top 10 players in pWins above Positional Average and Replacement Level were as follows.

pWins over Positional Average
Top 10 Players
          pWins over Replacement Level
Top 10 Players
Player pWins pLosses pWOPA pWORL           Player pWins pLosses pWOPA pWORL
1Barry Bonds26.915.64.9
6.6
1Barry Bonds26.915.64.9
6.6
2Jeff Blauser24.017.73.5
5.2
2Jeff Blauser24.017.73.5
5.2
3Kevin Appier15.48.83.4
4.5
3Roberto Alomar23.417.43.4
5.0
4Roberto Alomar23.417.43.4
5.0
4Larry Walker22.115.03.1
4.5
5Bill C. Swift16.711.83.2
4.4
5Kevin Appier15.48.83.4
4.5
6Larry Walker22.115.03.1
4.5
6Matt D. Williams22.015.33.0
4.5
7Matt D. Williams22.015.33.0
4.5
7Bill C. Swift16.711.83.2
4.4
8Randy 'Big Unit' Johnson17.011.33.0
4.3
8Paul Molitor18.512.82.6
4.4
9Greg Maddux18.113.53.0
4.3
9Randy 'Big Unit' Johnson17.011.33.0
4.3
10Frank E. Thomas21.214.12.9
4.3
10Greg Maddux18.113.53.0
4.3


The top 10 players in eWins above Positional Average and Replacement Level were as follows.

eWins over Positional Average
Top 10 Players
          eWins over Replacement Level
Top 10 Players
Player eWins eLosses eWOPA eWORL           Player eWins eLosses eWOPA eWORL
1Barry Bonds25.815.44.5
6.1
1Barry Bonds25.815.44.5
6.1
2Jose Rijo16.711.93.2
4.4
2Ken Griffey Jr.22.816.33.2
4.8
3Ken Griffey Jr.22.816.33.2
4.8
3Jose Rijo16.711.93.2
4.4
4Kevin Appier15.19.03.1
4.3
4Kevin Appier15.19.03.1
4.3
5John Olerud19.613.02.7
4.1
5John Olerud19.613.02.7
4.1
6Greg Maddux17.012.82.7
4.0
6Roberto Alomar22.017.82.5
4.0
7Randy 'Big Unit' Johnson16.611.52.7
4.0
7Randy 'Big Unit' Johnson16.611.52.7
4.0
8Chris Hoiles14.19.62.6
3.5
8Greg Maddux17.012.82.7
4.0
9Roberto Alomar22.017.82.5
4.0
9Lenny Dykstra25.020.21.9
3.7
10Robby Thompson17.813.32.3
3.5
10Jay Bell22.919.91.9
3.6


The 1993 season was a transitional year in baseball history. After 26 seasons with 26 major-league teams, 1993 saw expansion into Colorado and Florida, a transitional step toward the 30 MLB teams that have existed for the past 16 seasons.

The 1993 season was the 25th season with divisions and League Championship Series. It was also the last season with only 4 playoff teams.

Looking at the above tables, the 1993 season also represented a transition to the stars of the 1990s and 2000s: Barry Bonds, Ken Griffey, Jr., Roberto Alomar, Larry Walker, Greg Maddux, Randy Johnson, Tom Glavine.

The Atlanta Braves put three starting pitchers in the top 10 in major-league pWOPA and won 104 regular-season games only to lose in the playoffs to the 97-win Philadelphia Phillies, setting up two themes that would run through the 1990s and early 2000s: brilliant starting pitching and disappointing playoff losses.

Finally, and perhaps most significantly, the 1993 season was a transitional season between the relatively low-scoring baseball of the 1970s and 1980s and the high-scoring offenses of the late 1990s and early 2000s. The next table compares runs scored per 27 outs in 1993 with the 10 years before and after.

Runs per 27 Outs
1983 - 1992 4.57
1993 4.90
1994 - 2003 5.18


I take a look at a couple of the players from the above tables next.

Barry Bonds
The 1993 season was Barry Bonds's finest season before his late-career surge that started eight years later. The next table shows the top 25 seasons from 1961 (the start of the expansion era) through 1997 (just before the heart of the "sillyball" era), as measured by pWins over replacement level.

pWins over Replacement Level
Top 25 Single Seasons, 1961 - 1997
Player Season pWins pLosses pWOPA pWORL
1Sandy Koufax196525.014.56.2
8.0
2Steve Carlton197225.114.96.1
7.9
3Dwight Gooden198521.311.06.1
7.6
4Sandy Koufax196322.613.25.5
7.2
5Joe L. Morgan197225.816.05.3
7.0
6Joe L. Morgan197326.917.15.0
6.9
7Juan Marichal196622.914.25.2
6.7
8Barry Bonds199326.915.64.9
6.6
9Willie Mays196229.318.54.8
6.6
10Mickey Mantle196125.814.94.8
6.6
11Bob Gibson197021.713.65.0
6.5
12Greg Maddux199516.57.55.3
6.5
13Dean Chance196419.811.74.7
6.4
14Roger Clemens199718.69.84.7
6.4
15Robin Yount198225.217.74.7
6.3
16Roger Maris196126.915.54.4
6.3
17Denny McLain196922.915.54.5
6.3
18Fergie Jenkins197124.117.34.6
6.3
19Cal Ripken198425.819.34.5
6.2
20Fergie Jenkins197422.814.34.6
6.2
21Bob Gibson196821.914.14.8
6.2
22Joe L. Morgan197524.515.44.6
6.2
23Joe L. Morgan197623.314.34.7
6.2
24Randy 'Big Unit' Johnson199516.57.54.8
6.1
25Denny McLain196823.015.74.6
6.1


Kevin Appier
Two all-time great pitchers, Greg Maddux and Randy Johnson show up on all four of the above tables. And just above them in both pWins and eWins over positional average is Kevin Appier.

For the first half of the 1990's, Kevin Appier was very much in contention for the title of "Best Pitcher of the 1990's". The next table shows the top five pitchers in eWins over both positional average and replacement level from 1990 through 1996.

Top Pitchers, 1990 - 1996
eWins over Positional Average
          Top Pitchers, 1990 - 1996
eWins over Replacement Level
Player eWins eLosses eWOPA eWORL           Player eWins eLosses eWOPA eWORL
Greg Maddux111.978.621.8
30.8
Greg Maddux111.978.621.8
30.8
Roger Clemens93.866.415.1
23.5
Roger Clemens93.866.415.1
23.5
Kevin Appier87.363.813.0
21.0
Kevin Appier87.363.813.0
21.0
J. Kevin Brown88.570.710.6
18.9
Tom Glavine97.185.810.6
19.2
Tom Glavine97.185.810.6
19.2
J. Kevin Brown88.570.710.6
18.9


Unfortunately for Appier, he was only able to pitch in 3 games in 1998 and was never as good after the injury as before. And Kevin Appier ended up largely forgotten behind the elite pitchers of the 1990s.

The next table presents the career of Kevin Appier, as measured by Player won-lost records.

Kevin Appier
Basic Player Won-Lost Records
Value Decomposition
Season Team Age Games pWins pLosses pWin Pct. pWOPA pWORL eWins eLosses eWin Pct. eWOPA eWORL
1989KCA21
6
1.32.70.323-0.7
-0.5
1.22.00.380-0.4-0.2
1990KCA22
32
10.59.30.5310.7
1.7
10.69.30.5350.81.8
1991KCA23
34
13.410.60.5581.5
2.8
12.910.30.5561.42.6
1992KCA24
30
13.59.70.5832.1
3.4
12.89.60.5731.93.1
1993KCA25
34
15.48.80.6353.4
4.5
15.19.00.6263.14.3
1994KCA26
23
9.36.90.5731.3
2.2
9.86.90.5861.52.5
1995KCA27
31
13.711.20.5511.6
2.9
12.69.10.5812.03.2
1996KCA28
32
13.410.00.5732.0
3.3
13.59.60.5842.23.5
1997KCA29
34
12.711.40.5270.9
2.3
14.511.80.5521.63.2
1998KCA30
3
0.91.50.375-0.3
-0.1
0.91.00.466-0.00.1
31
34
13.414.00.489-0.1
1.4
12.814.00.479-0.41.0
2000OAK32
31
11.511.80.4940.1
1.3
11.912.00.4980.21.4
2001NYN33
33
13.012.20.5151.0
2.3
13.612.90.5141.12.4
2002ANA34
32
11.510.70.5200.6
1.8
11.611.40.5060.31.6
35
23
7.68.90.459-0.5
0.4
6.28.40.425-0.9-0.1
2004KCA36
2
0.20.50.279-0.1
-0.1
0.20.30.417-0.0-0.0
------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------
CAREER (reg. season)
414
161.2140.10.53513.6
29.8
160.4137.50.53814.430.4
------ ------ ------ ------ ------
PostSeason (career)
7
1.81.80.493 0.21.92.30.459 0.1
------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------
COMBINED
421
163.0141.90.535
30.0
162.3139.80.538 30.5


1993 Postseason

The 1993 postseason was the last to feature only four playoff teams. In the National League, the 104-win Atlanta Braves managed to barely hold off the 103-win San Francisco Giants to win the National League West. With the introduction of wild cards, the Giants will almost certainly go down in history as the last 100-win team to miss the playoffs. The Braves faced the surprising winners of the NL East, the Philadelphia Phillies. Despite having won 7 fewer games in the regular season, the Phillies knocked off the Braves in six games. The AL East champion Toronto Blue Jays were also able to dispatch their West Division counterparts - the Chicago White Sox - in six games.

The 1993 World Series became the first (and, so far, only) World Series to end on a come-from-behind walkoff home run, by Joe Carter off of Phillies closer Mitch Williams with one out in the bottom of the ninth inning of Game 6 with the Phillies leading 6-5, two outs away from forcing a Game 7.

The top players in the 1993 postseason, as measured by Player won-lost records, are presented next. These records are calculated treating each game as equal, so Joe Carter gets credit for a game-winning 3-run home run, but no extra credit because it won the World Series.

1993 Postseason: Total
pWins pLosses pWORL
Paul MolitorTOR2.00.60.9


Top postseason players by round were as follows.

1993 Postseason: World Series
pWins pLosses pWORL
Paul MolitorTOR1.20.30.6

1993 Postseason: League Championship Series
pWins pLosses pWORL
Fred McGriffATL1.40.60.4
Mitch WilliamsPHI1.00.40.4
Juan GuzmanTOR1.20.60.4


Best of 1993 by Factor and Position

Next, let's look at the top players in (context-neutral, teammate-adjusted) eWins over Positional Average in various aspects of the game.
Best by Factor: Batting, Baserunning, Pitching, Fielding
There are four basic factors for which players earn Player won-lost records: Batting, Baserunning, Pitching, and Fielding. The top players in 1993 in eWOPA by factor were as follows.

Batting
eWins eLosses eWOPA
Barry Bonds17.59.53.8

Positional Average excludes pitcher offense



Baserunning
eWins eLosses eWOPA
Kenny Lofton2.41.20.6
Devon White1.80.70.5
Roberto Alomar2.21.20.5

Positional Average excludes pitcher offense



Pitching
eWins eLosses Net Wins
Kevin Appier13.48.84.5
Greg Maddux14.010.13.9
Jose Rijo13.39.83.5
Randy 'Big Unit' Johnson14.711.23.5


Fielding, P
eWins eLosses Net Wins
Bob Tewksbury0.60.30.4


Fielding, C
eWins eLosses Net Wins
Rick Wilkins1.91.40.5


Fielding, 1B
eWins eLosses Net Wins
Kevin Young2.61.90.7


Fielding, 2B
eWins eLosses Net Wins
Delino DeShields Sr.5.44.60.8
Robby Thompson4.84.00.8


Fielding, 3B
eWins eLosses Net Wins
Robin Ventura4.63.70.9


Fielding, SS
eWins eLosses Net Wins
Jay Bell7.66.51.1


Fielding, LF
eWins eLosses Net Wins
Barry Bonds6.44.81.7


Fielding, CF
eWins eLosses Net Wins
Darren Lewis4.43.41.0
Marquis Grissom6.45.41.0


Fielding, RF
eWins eLosses Net Wins
Wayne Kirby4.73.41.3


Best by Position
Next, we look at 1993 Major-League leaders in eWOPA by position. The figures shown here only include Player decisions earned while playing this particular position, and include no contextual adjustments (expected or actual).



Catcher
eWins eLosses eWOPA
Chris Hoiles13.89.72.3


First Base
eWins eLosses eWOPA
John Olerud17.911.72.5


Second Base
eWins eLosses eWOPA
Roberto Alomar21.818.22.2


Third Base
eWins eLosses eWOPA
Matt D. Williams18.915.51.4


Shortstop
eWins eLosses eWOPA
Jay Bell22.820.01.8
Jeff Blauser21.218.51.8


Left Field
eWins eLosses eWOPA
Barry Bonds25.315.94.0


Center Field
eWins eLosses eWOPA
Ken Griffey Jr.20.515.42.5


Right Field
eWins eLosses eWOPA
Tim Salmon19.315.41.8


Tim Salmon is sometimes mentioned as the best major-league player since the advent of the All-Star game (in 1933) to never be selected to an All-Star team. Certainly, the best right fielder in the major leagues should probably have earned an All-Star berth. And, in fact, 1993 was not the only season in which Tim Salmon was the best right fielder in baseball, nor was it his best season: that was probably 1995 (but could have also been either 1997 or 2002). You can't even blame it on Salmon getting off to slow starts: for his career, his 1st-half OPS was .883 vs. a 2nd-half OPS of .884. Just one of those odd, inexplicable things.

Starting Pitcher
eWins eLosses eWOPA
Kevin Appier13.69.12.3
Greg Maddux14.710.82.1


Relief Pitcher
eWins eLosses eWOPA
Jeff Montgomery5.13.40.8


For relief pitchers, context-neutral records may not be the best measure of how good they are, as context can matter a great deal, depending on how a pitcher is used. Here are the top relief pitchers of 1993 in context, in terms of pWins and pWOPA.

Top Relief Pitchers of 1993, based on pWORL
Player pWins pLosses pWin Pct. pWOPA pWORL
John Wetteland10.24.70.6872.73.6
Jeff Montgomery9.84.50.6842.53.4
Rod Beck8.33.40.7122.43.1
Bryan Harvey7.83.50.6882.02.7
Randy Myers7.44.20.6371.52.2


Designated Hitter
eWins eLosses eWOPA
Paul Molitor14.311.61.2


Finally, here are the best at three oft-forgotten positions that can nevertheless matter: pitcher offense, pinch hitting, and pinch running.

Pitcher Offense
eWins eLosses eWOPA
Orel Hershiser1.41.60.5
Chris Hammond1.41.50.5


Pinch Hitter
eWins eLosses eWOPA
Gerald Perry2.31.60.4


Pinch Runner
eWins eLosses eWOPA
Fernando Vina0.30.10.1


Noteworthy Players of 1993

Finally, let's take a look at some players who had noteworthy 1993 seasons.

Notable Debuts
As I am writing this (in February, 2014), no players who debuted in 1993 have been elected to either the Hall of Fame or the Hall of Merit. This is because the very best players who debuted in 1993 are not yet eligible for election to these institutions.

There is one player who debuted in 1993 who I am almost certain will eventually be elected to both Halls: Chipper Jones. Chipper Jones's career record, as measured by Player won-lost records, is presented in the next table.

Chipper Jones
Basic Player Won-Lost Records
Value Decomposition
Season Team Age Games pWins pLosses pWin Pct. pWOPA pWORL eWins eLosses eWin Pct. eWOPA eWORL
1993ATL21
5
0.00.00.088-0.0
-0.0
0.20.10.7790.10.1
1995ATL23
140
20.115.50.5661.9
3.4
17.816.30.5220.41.7
1996ATL24
157
23.016.90.5772.8
4.4
21.917.20.5602.13.7
1997ATL25
157
21.417.90.5451.4
3.0
20.617.70.5381.12.6
1998ATL26
160
23.615.80.5993.6
5.1
21.516.30.5692.33.8
1999ATL27
157
22.615.00.6013.6
5.1
21.816.00.5772.74.2
2000ATL28
155
21.216.60.5612.3
3.8
19.816.10.5511.83.2
2001ATL29
159
20.916.20.5632.0
3.6
21.216.10.5682.33.9
2002ATL30
158
24.718.40.5742.3
4.1
23.017.80.5641.83.5
2003ATL31
153
21.217.20.5521.2
2.7
19.116.40.5370.52.0
2004ATL32
137
17.112.90.5701.7
2.9
15.812.80.5541.12.2
2005ATL33
109
16.010.50.6052.5
3.5
13.610.40.5671.42.3
2006ATL34
110
13.212.00.5230.2
1.1
14.511.10.5651.32.2
2007ATL35
134
19.414.20.5782.2
3.5
18.612.90.5912.53.7
2008ATL36
128
15.612.10.5631.4
2.5
16.111.80.5771.92.9
2009ATL37
143
15.914.20.5280.7
1.8
16.115.10.5160.31.5
2010ATL38
95
12.19.20.5661.3
2.1
10.78.90.5460.81.5
2011ATL39
126
14.712.70.5371.0
2.1
14.913.00.5330.92.0
2012ATL40
112
14.011.30.5531.1
2.0
12.811.20.5340.61.4
------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------
CAREER (reg. season)
2,495
336.7258.50.56633.3
56.5
319.9257.10.55425.848.3
------ ------ ------ ------ ------
PostSeason (career)
93
11.110.80.505 0.811.410.70.517 1.0
------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------
COMBINED
2,588
347.7269.30.566
57.3
331.3267.80.554 49.4


Last Hurrahs
As I discussed above, the 1993 season was a transition season. One final way in which the 1993 season worked was as a final transition away from the stars of the 1970s and 1980s and to the stars of the 1990s and 2000s. Several of these latter stars were discussed above.

The transition away from the stars of the 1970s and 1980s is most evident by looking at the players for whom 1993 was their final major-league season. This included four players who were elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame: Nolan Ryan, George Brett, Robin Yount, and Carlton Fisk.

The career records of these four players, as measured by Player won-lost records, are presented in the final two tables of this article.

Nolan Ryan George Brett
Season Games pWins pLoss Win Pct. pWOPA pWORL Games pWins pLoss Win Pct. pWOPA pWORL
196620.10.50.193-0.2
-0.1
1967
 
1968217.89.90.442-0.7
0.0
1969255.14.80.5130.2
0.8
1970278.611.00.438-0.9
0.0
19713011.614.70.441-1.0
0.1
19723921.420.00.5171.6
3.4
19734122.915.70.5943.9
5.7
130.61.00.371-0.2-0.2
19744221.818.40.5422.0
3.8
13313.014.40.474-0.80.3
19752812.512.10.5100.4
1.5
15920.917.70.5411.63.1
19763920.217.80.5321.4
3.1
15922.417.20.5652.54.0
19773719.916.50.5482.0
3.9
13921.315.60.5762.74.2
19783115.413.30.5371.2
2.5
12816.614.20.5411.22.3
19793416.213.50.5451.6
2.9
15421.116.70.5592.13.6
19803514.913.90.5181.1
2.2
11718.510.20.6454.15.2
19812110.77.60.5852.1
2.9
8910.610.40.506-0.00.8
19823516.315.70.5101.1
2.4
14418.515.00.5521.62.9
19832913.211.50.5341.5
2.5
12316.613.80.5461.22.3
19843011.813.00.4770.1
1.0
10414.910.90.5762.13.0
19853513.713.80.4980.6
1.9
15522.115.30.5903.44.8
19863012.511.80.5161.0
2.0
12315.513.10.5421.12.1
19873413.413.70.4940.6
1.8
11512.611.80.517-0.11.0
19883313.915.30.477-0.0
1.2
15718.215.10.5471.12.5
19893216.211.50.5842.6
3.9
12414.512.40.5390.41.4
19903012.310.10.5501.3
2.4
14215.413.90.5250.31.5
19912710.88.00.5751.5
2.5
13111.111.30.495-0.50.8
1992279.69.40.5050.3
1.3
15211.612.40.484-0.70.6
1993133.84.70.448-0.4
-0.0
14512.112.40.492-0.31.2
------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------
CAREER RECORDS807356.9328.10.52124.6
55.8
2,706328.0274.90.54422.847.6


Robin Yount Carlton Fisk
Season Games pWins pLoss Win Pct. pWOPA pWORL Games pWins pLoss Win Pct. pWOPA pWORL
1971
 
141.21.20.482-0.00.1
1972
 
13114.810.50.5842.23.2
1973
 
13513.612.70.5170.81.9
197410710.613.20.444-0.8
0.1
525.84.40.5680.81.2
197514716.119.80.449-0.9
0.6
798.46.40.5661.11.7
197616118.922.20.460-0.8
0.8
13412.512.80.4940.31.2
197715417.620.60.461-0.3
1.2
15218.312.00.6043.24.4
197812718.316.50.5271.7
3.0
15718.413.10.5843.04.3
197914918.717.60.5151.5
2.9
917.36.60.5240.41.1
198014321.718.00.5472.8
4.3
13112.711.10.5341.02.0
19819614.710.70.5792.6
3.6
959.49.40.5010.21.0
198215625.217.70.5884.7
6.3
13513.112.70.5080.51.5
198314921.316.30.5663.0
4.4
13715.311.40.5732.43.3
198415920.019.30.5081.1
2.8
1028.09.60.454-0.50.2
198512215.515.60.500-0.3
1.0
15317.613.30.5692.53.7
198613816.816.10.5100.2
1.4
12510.914.60.427-1.7-0.7
198715820.818.00.5371.2
2.7
13513.012.20.5161.02.0
198816223.719.60.5461.8
3.5
767.47.00.5130.51.0
198916022.018.60.5421.8
3.3
10311.09.40.5391.32.0
199015818.619.00.495-0.5
0.9
13714.510.90.5692.13.1
199113016.314.70.5260.8
2.0
13412.913.10.4970.41.4
199215018.217.10.5150.4
1.7
624.84.70.5060.20.6
199312712.114.80.450-1.4
-0.3
250.71.40.327-0.3-0.3
------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------
CAREER RECORDS2,853367.2345.60.51518.5
46.1
2,495251.4220.60.53321.440.1




All articles are written so that they pull data directly from the most recent version of the Player won-lost database. Hence, any numbers cited within these articles should automatically incorporate the most recent update to Player won-lost records. In some cases, however, the accompanying text may have been written based on previous versions of Player won-lost records. I apologize if this results in non-sensical text in any cases.

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