Baseball Player Won-Loss Records
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The 1996 Season as seen through the Prism of Player Won-Lost Records



Next in my continuing series of looking at individual seasons through the prism of Player won-lost records is the 1996 season.

The Best of 1996

I calculate Player won-lost records two ways: pWins, which tie to team wins and eWins, which control for context and the ability of one's teammates. For players with more pWins than eWins, their Player wins contributed to more team wins than one might expect; for players with more eWins than pWins, just the opposite is true: their Player wins translated into fewer team wins than expected. Or more briefly: a player with more pWins than eWins was better in context, a player with more eWins than pWins was worse in context.

The top 10 players in pWins above Positional Average and Replacement Level were as follows.

pWins over Positional Average
Top 10 Players
          pWins over Replacement Level
Top 10 Players
Player pWins pLosses pWOPA pWORL           Player pWins pLosses pWOPA pWORL
1John Smoltz18.211.83.8
5.3
1John Smoltz18.211.83.8
5.3
2Ken Caminiti23.615.83.5
5.1
2Ken Caminiti23.615.83.5
5.1
3Mike Piazza19.413.13.5
4.8
3Alex Rodriguez22.316.83.4
5.0
4Alex Rodriguez22.316.83.4
5.0
4Roberto Alomar21.816.33.3
4.9
5J. Kevin Brown16.210.63.3
4.7
5Barry Bonds25.617.73.1
4.9
6Roberto Alomar21.816.33.3
4.9
6Mike Piazza19.413.13.5
4.8
7Barry Bonds25.617.73.1
4.9
7Pat Hentgen17.912.03.0
4.7
8Mariano Rivera9.73.63.0
3.9
8J. Kevin Brown16.210.63.3
4.7
9Pat Hentgen17.912.03.0
4.7
9Chipper Jones23.016.92.8
4.4
10Jim Thome20.314.13.0
4.4
10Jeff Bagwell22.915.02.9
4.4


The top 10 players in eWins above Positional Average and Replacement Level were as follows.

eWins over Positional Average
Top 10 Players
          eWins over Replacement Level
Top 10 Players
Player eWins eLosses eWOPA eWORL           Player eWins eLosses eWOPA eWORL
1Alex Rodriguez23.116.14.2
5.8
1Alex Rodriguez23.116.14.2
5.8
2Greg Maddux17.210.73.8
5.2
2Barry Bonds26.317.13.8
5.5
3Barry Bonds26.317.13.8
5.5
3Greg Maddux17.210.73.8
5.2
4J. Kevin Brown16.410.43.5
4.9
4J. Kevin Brown16.410.43.5
4.9
5John Smoltz17.612.43.2
4.7
5John Smoltz17.612.43.2
4.7
6Mark McGwire16.79.92.9
4.0
6Barry Larkin22.617.82.8
4.5
7Barry Larkin22.617.82.8
4.5
7Gary Sheffield25.518.82.5
4.3
8Ken Griffey Jr.19.814.12.8
4.2
8Ken Caminiti22.816.62.7
4.3
9Ken Caminiti22.816.62.7
4.3
9Pat Hentgen17.512.42.6
4.3
10Roberto Alomar21.117.02.6
4.2
10Roberto Alomar21.117.02.6
4.2


Braves Ace: Greg Maddux or John Smoltz
According to all four tables above, the best pitcher in major-league baseball in 1996 was a starting pitcher for the Atlanta Braves. If you look at pWins, which are tied to team wins and incorporate context, the best pitcher in major-league baseball was John Smoltz. But if you control for context and teammate quality, the best pitcher in baseball was Smoltz's teammate, Greg Maddux.

The next table compares the 1996 seasons of Greg Maddux and John Smoltz, as measured by Player won-lost records.

Games pWins pLosses pWin Pct. pWOPA pWORL eWins eLosses eWin Pct. eWOPA eWORL
Greg Maddux
35
16.211.70.5812.8
4.2
17.210.70.6183.85.2
John Smoltz
35
18.211.80.6063.8
5.3
17.612.40.5883.24.7


John Smoltz led the National League in innings pitched, strikeouts, K/9, pitcher wins, and pitcher winning percentage. Based on all of that (but probably mostly the 24 wins), he won the Cy Young Award. Greg Maddux actually put up a slightly lower ERA than Smoltz, however, 2.72 to 2.94. Smoltz's advantages in pWins are largely the result of the Braves going 26-9 in Smoltz's starts but only 20-15 in Maddux's starts. And a large part of that advantage was that the Braves scored 5.32 runs per 27 outs in Smoltz's starts versus 3.92 runs per 27 outs in Maddux's starts.

Some of that difference in run support was just dumb luck, but some of it was because Smoltz (.218/.253/.295) out-hit Maddux (.147/.183/.176), and some of it was because Maddux pitched with backup catcher Eddie Perez (.256/.293/.404) more frequently than Smoltz did, while Smoltz pitched almost exclusivelywith Javy Lopez (.282/.322/.456) behind the plate.

One other advantage that Smoltz enjoyed over Maddux was that, by leading the league in strikeouts and K/9, Smoltz did more of the job of defense himself without relying on his defense. In fact, according to Fangraphs, Smoltz actually had a slightly better FIP (Fielding Independent Pitching) than Maddux in 1996, 2.64 to 2.73.

It may or may not be fair to give Smoltz credit for pitching in more win-favorable conditions, but it's hard to argue with the results.

The next table compares the careers of Greg Maddux and John Smoltz, as measured by Player won-lost records.

Greg Maddux John Smoltz
Season Games pWins pLoss Win Pct. pWOPA pWORL Games pWins pLoss Win Pct. pWOPA pWORL
198661.62.30.418-0.2
-0.1
1987349.913.50.423-1.5
-0.4
19883717.412.50.5813.0
4.3
124.36.30.407-0.9-0.4
19893516.114.10.5331.5
2.8
3314.412.70.5311.32.5
19903515.614.80.5141.0
2.3
3814.815.60.4850.11.5
19913915.813.70.5351.6
2.9
3814.613.50.5201.02.3
19923517.712.40.5873.3
4.7
3617.116.00.5171.12.7
19933618.113.50.5722.8
4.2
3515.514.40.5191.12.4
19942514.48.10.6403.6
4.7
219.09.50.4850.01.0
19952816.57.50.6895.0
6.2
2911.810.80.5210.81.9
19963516.211.70.5812.8
4.2
3518.211.80.6063.85.3
19973314.29.20.6083.0
4.2
3616.414.80.5251.43.1
19983417.112.00.5883.1
4.5
2613.37.70.6333.24.2
19993315.912.90.5522.0
3.4
2913.510.80.5571.93.0
20003517.112.20.5833.0
4.4
20013516.111.70.5802.7
4.1
364.42.40.6441.01.4
20023513.110.20.5621.9
3.0
7510.03.90.7233.14.1
20033713.513.90.4930.3
1.7
625.72.40.7001.62.2
20043414.713.10.5291.4
2.8
737.83.50.6912.22.9
20053512.514.70.458-0.6
0.6
3313.611.80.5351.42.5
20063413.312.40.5181.0
2.2
3515.313.60.5291.52.9
20073511.611.30.5070.6
1.7
3212.911.00.5401.42.6
20083410.113.80.423-1.5
-0.3
62.42.00.5440.30.5
2009
 
154.96.50.429-0.7-0.1
------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------
CAREER RECORDS759328.5271.30.54839.9
68.5
735239.7201.10.54426.648.5


Position Player Comparison: Barry Larkin vs. Mike Piazza
Another comparison of how context can affect relative value is Cincinnati Reds shortstop Barry Larkin versus Los Angeles Dodgers catcher Mike Piazza.

The next table compares their 1996 seasons, as measured by Player won-lost records.

Games pWins pLosses pWin Pct. pWOPA pWORL eWins eLosses eWin Pct. eWOPA eWORL
Barry Larkin
152
22.018.40.5452.2
3.9
22.617.80.5602.84.5
Mike Piazza
148
19.413.10.5983.5
4.8
18.414.00.5682.53.8


Barry Larkin's 1996 performance translated into somewhat fewer Reds' wins than expected while Piazza's performance produced slightly more Dodgers' wins than expected. The reason for this was basically the timing of their performances. Baseball-Reference shows players' batting splits for various splits. One breakdown they show is by the "leverage" of the situation.

Overall in 1996, Barry Larkin's OPS was .977. By leverage, his OPS in high-leverage situations was .890; in medium leverage, .940; and, in low leverage, 1.036.

For Mike Piazza, the split was just the opposite. His overall OPS of .985 broke down between high, medium, and low leverage as 1.238, .966, and .887, respectively.

For both Larkin and Piazza, the extremity of these splits by leverage in 1996 were unusual. For his career, Larkin's OPS splits were .806/.825/.810 in high/medium/low-leverage situations. For his career, Piazza's splits were .929/.891/.949 in high/medium/low-leverage situations.

The next table compares the careers of Barry Larkin and Mike Piazza, as measured by Player won-lost records.

Barry Larkin Mike Piazza
Season Games pWins pLoss Win Pct. pWOPA pWORL Games pWins pLoss Win Pct. pWOPA pWORL
1986415.44.40.5510.7
1.0
198712514.513.90.5100.7
1.8
198815122.918.90.5482.4
3.9
19899713.69.90.5772.1
3.0
199015822.818.60.5512.6
4.1
199112319.015.40.5532.2
3.5
199214021.316.10.5693.1
4.5
211.21.90.388-0.3-0.2
199310013.712.30.5271.0
2.0
14918.013.80.5672.23.5
199411016.213.70.5421.6
2.9
10712.59.80.5611.62.5
199513119.915.00.5692.8
4.2
11214.610.10.5902.43.4
199615222.018.40.5452.2
3.9
14819.413.10.5983.54.8
1997738.28.20.5000.2
0.8
15218.013.30.5762.53.8
199814519.916.60.5452.0
3.5
15118.513.20.5853.14.4
199916122.617.50.5642.9
4.5
14117.914.00.5612.33.6
200010211.812.90.477-0.3
0.7
13617.911.80.6033.34.5
2001455.74.70.5460.6
1.0
14116.713.30.5572.33.6
200214513.915.50.472-0.6
0.6
13513.413.30.5030.61.7
2003707.96.60.5430.7
1.3
676.46.40.4970.10.6
200411110.810.60.5040.2
1.1
12911.212.00.482-0.50.4
2005
 
1139.710.60.479-0.20.6
2006
 
12610.910.70.5050.31.1
2007
 
836.77.00.488-0.40.4
------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------
CAREER RECORDS2,180292.1249.40.53927.0
48.2
1,911213.0174.20.55022.738.6


Top AL Pitcher: Pat Hentgen
The only American League pitcher to appear in any of the above tables is Toronto Blue Jays pitcher Pat Hentgen. Hentgen led the American League in innnings pitched (265.2), complete games (10), shutouts (3), and home runs allowed per nine innings (0.7). He was second in the league in ERA (3.22) and pitcher wins (20). It was a strong performance for which he deservedly won the American League Cy Young award.

Unfortunately, Pat Hentgen suffered the fate of so many major-league pitchers. Although he was only 27 in 1996, he only had one more good year left in him. The 1997 season was the last one in which Hentgen pitched 200 innings. Pat Hentgen's career, as measured by Player won-lost records, is shown in the next table.

Pat Hentgen
Basic Player Won-Lost Records
Value Decomposition
Season Team Age Games pWins pLosses pWin Pct. pWOPA pWORL eWins eLosses eWin Pct. eWOPA eWORL
1991TOR22
3
0.20.10.6390.1
0.1
0.20.20.5030.00.0
1992TOR23
28
1.81.50.5470.2
0.4
1.51.70.464-0.10.1
1993TOR24
34
14.311.40.5561.4
2.7
12.812.90.497-0.11.2
1994TOR25
24
12.59.10.5781.7
2.9
11.99.70.5511.12.4
1995TOR26
30
11.512.50.480-0.5
0.8
11.712.30.488-0.31.0
1996TOR27
35
17.912.00.5993.0
4.7
17.512.40.5862.64.3
1997TOR28
35
15.114.40.5120.4
2.1
15.613.80.5310.92.7
1998TOR29
29
10.712.40.463-0.8
0.4
10.912.30.470-0.70.6
1999TOR30
34
10.410.90.486-0.3
0.8
10.211.10.481-0.40.7
2000SLN31
33
12.413.50.479-0.1
1.2
12.413.50.479-0.11.2
2001BAL32
9
3.32.80.5400.2
0.6
3.42.80.5550.30.7
2002BAL33
4
1.12.50.299-0.7
-0.5
1.32.30.351-0.5-0.3
2003BAL34
28
8.89.80.476-0.4
0.7
8.99.70.480-0.40.7
2004TOR35
18
4.27.90.344-1.9
-1.2
5.07.10.415-1.0-0.3
------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------
CAREER (reg. season)
344
124.3120.90.5072.3
15.6
123.5121.70.5041.514.8
------ ------ ------ ------ ------
PostSeason (career)
3
1.51.60.476 0.10.91.10.449 0.0
------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------
COMBINED
347
125.8122.50.507
15.7
124.3122.80.504 14.8


1996 Postseason

The 1996 postseason saw the first of two World Series matchups between the two teams with the strongest claim as the best team of the 1990s. The New York Yankees defeated the Atlanta Braves, 4 games to 2, to win their first World Series in 18 seasons and what would be the first of four World Series titles in five seasons.

The best performers in the 1996 postseason, ranked by pWins over replacement level, are presented next.

1996 Postseason: Total
pWins pLosses pWORL
Bernie WilliamsNYA2.81.21.0
John SmoltzATL2.31.30.8


Top postseason players by round were as follows.

1996 Postseason: World Series
pWins pLosses pWORL
Greg MadduxATL0.90.40.4
Andruw JonesATL1.20.70.3
John WettelandNYA0.60.10.3
Mariano RiveraNYA0.50.20.2
Jim LeyritzNYA0.50.10.2
Charlie HayesNYA0.60.20.2
John SmoltzATL0.80.60.2
David ConeNYA0.60.30.2

1996 Postseason: League Championship Series
pWins pLosses pWORL
Bernie WilliamsNYA1.50.40.6
Mark LemkeATL1.50.60.6

1996 Postseason: Division Series
pWins pLosses pWORL
John BurkettTEX0.80.20.3
Brian JordanSLN0.70.20.3
John SmoltzATL0.60.20.3
John WettelandNYA0.70.20.3
Juan GonzalezTEX0.80.30.3
Bernie WilliamsNYA0.80.30.3
Brady AndersonBAL0.80.40.3


Best of 1996 by Factor and Position

Next, let's look at the top players in (context-neutral, teammate-adjusted) eWins over Positional Average in various aspects of the game.
Best by Factor: Batting, Baserunning, Pitching, Fielding
There are four basic factors for which players earn Player won-lost records: Batting, Baserunning, Pitching, and Fielding. The top players in 1996 in eWOPA by factor were as follows.

Batting
eWins eLosses eWOPA
Barry Bonds17.29.93.4
Gary Sheffield16.810.03.1

Positional Average excludes pitcher offense



Baserunning
eWins eLosses eWOPA
Delino DeShields Sr.1.81.00.3
Kenny Lofton2.11.50.3
Lance Johnson2.31.70.3
Roberto Alomar1.51.00.3
Ray Durham1.30.80.3

Positional Average excludes pitcher offense



Pitching
eWins eLosses Net Wins
Greg Maddux13.78.35.4
J. Kevin Brown11.87.24.7


Fielding, P
eWins eLosses Net Wins
Bob Tewksbury0.40.10.3
Alex Fernandez0.40.20.3
Kevin Ritz0.40.10.3


Fielding, C
eWins eLosses Net Wins
Ivan Rodriguez2.11.20.9


Fielding, 1B
eWins eLosses Net Wins
John Mabry2.21.60.6


Fielding, 2B
eWins eLosses Net Wins
Jody Reed5.44.80.7


Fielding, 3B
eWins eLosses Net Wins
Vinny Castilla5.94.81.1


Fielding, SS
eWins eLosses Net Wins
Rey Sanchez3.93.20.7
Alex Rodriguez5.64.90.7
Jose Valentin6.15.40.7


Fielding, LF
eWins eLosses Net Wins
Bernard Gilkey7.45.81.6


Fielding, CF
eWins eLosses Net Wins
Brian L. Hunter5.84.51.3


Fielding, RF
eWins eLosses Net Wins
Sammy Sosa6.14.61.5


Best by Position
Next, we look at 1996 Major-League leaders in eWOPA by position. The figures shown here only include Player decisions earned while playing this particular position, and include no contextual adjustments (expected or actual).



Catcher
eWins eLosses eWOPA
Todd Hundley16.712.92.2
Mike Piazza17.113.32.2


First Base
eWins eLosses eWOPA
Jeff Bagwell22.015.32.3


Second Base
eWins eLosses eWOPA
Chuck Knoblauch19.916.62.3


Third Base
eWins eLosses eWOPA
Ken Caminiti22.016.52.3


Shortstop
eWins eLosses eWOPA
Alex Rodriguez22.916.53.9


Left Field
eWins eLosses eWOPA
Barry Bonds24.616.53.2


Center Field
eWins eLosses eWOPA
Ken Griffey Jr.19.814.52.6


Right Field
eWins eLosses eWOPA
Gary Sheffield23.417.82.0


Starting Pitcher
eWins eLosses eWOPA
Greg Maddux14.38.92.7


Relief Pitcher
eWins eLosses eWOPA
Mariano Rivera6.53.21.7


For relief pitchers, context-neutral records may not be the best measure of how good they are, as context can matter a great deal, depending on how a pitcher is used. Here are the top relief pitchers of 1996 in context, in terms of pWins and pWOPA.

Top Relief Pitchers of 1996, based on pWORL
Player pWins pLosses pWin Pct. pWOPA pWORL
Mariano Rivera9.73.60.7293.03.9
Trevor Hoffman9.74.70.6772.63.5
Troy Percival8.13.50.6972.33.1
John Wetteland8.23.90.6762.12.9
Roberto M. Hernandez9.15.40.6281.92.8


The 1996 season was the best season of Mariano Rivera's long and illustrious career.

Designated Hitter
eWins eLosses eWOPA
Edgar Martinez14.410.21.7


Finally, here are the best at three oft-forgotten positions that can nevertheless matter: pitcher offense, pinch hitting, and pinch running.

Pitcher Offense
eWins eLosses eWOPA
Shane Reynolds1.41.80.4
Tom Glavine1.41.70.4
Jim Bullinger0.80.60.4
Steve Avery1.01.00.4


Pinch Hitter
eWins eLosses eWOPA
Billy Ashley1.30.50.5


Pinch Runner
eWins eLosses eWOPA
David Hulse0.30.10.1
Jesus Tavarez0.20.00.1
Royce Clayton0.20.00.1
Jeff Blauser0.20.00.1


Noteworthy Players of 1996

Finally, let's take a look at some players who had noteworthy 1996 seasons.

Notable Debuts
It is too early to say for sure whether any players who debuted in 1996 will eventually make the Baseball Hall of Fame. In my opinion, the two players most deserving of eventual Hall-of-Fame enshrinement, as evaluatedby Player won-lost records, who debuted in 1996, were probably Scott Rolen and Vladimir Guerrero. Rolen and Guerrero both merely made token appearances in 1996. In fact, Rolen won the NL Rookie of the Year award (unanimously) in 1997. Both Rolen's and Guerrero's career value, as measured by Player won-lost records, fall within the historical standards for the Hall of Fame.

Scott Rolen's and Vlad Guerrero's careers, as measured by Player won-lost records, are compared in the next table.

Scott Rolen Vladimir Guerrero
Season Games pWins pLoss Win Pct. pWOPA pWORL Games pWins pLoss Win Pct. pWOPA pWORL
1996374.34.50.489-0.2
0.2
90.61.00.364-0.2-0.2
199715621.118.70.5300.9
2.5
9010.712.20.469-1.2-0.3
199816021.617.50.5531.8
3.3
15922.920.00.5340.52.2
199911215.011.40.5681.7
2.7
16024.421.30.5330.62.3
200012816.214.70.5240.7
2.0
15424.120.70.5381.02.8
200115120.415.50.5672.2
3.7
15925.022.40.5270.32.3
200215522.017.30.5602.2
3.8
16126.119.20.5752.54.3
200315420.916.40.5592.2
3.6
11217.113.60.5571.22.4
200414222.913.80.6244.1
5.5
15622.618.00.5562.03.6
2005566.96.00.5370.4
0.8
14120.614.70.5832.53.9
200614217.617.20.505-0.3
1.0
15621.219.10.5270.72.3
200711213.412.90.5090.0
0.9
15022.615.80.5893.04.5
200811513.911.60.5451.1
2.0
14318.814.80.5591.63.1
200912815.312.10.5581.6
2.6
1008.58.60.494-0.30.7
201013317.514.80.5421.2
2.4
15216.513.40.5521.33.0
2011657.97.80.5020.1
0.7
14510.212.50.450-1.5-0.1
2012918.98.70.505-0.1
0.6
------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------
CAREER RECORDS2,037265.8221.10.54619.5
38.3
2,147291.9247.40.54114.037.0


Last Hurrahs
Finally, 1996 was the final season for two players who have been elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame: Andre Dawson and Ozzie Smith. One other player who should have joined Dawson and Smith in the Hall of Fame by now, Alan Trammell, also played his final game in 1996.

I compared the careers of Ozzie Smith and Alan Trammell in an earlier article.

The next table compares the career records of Andre Dawson and Ozzie Smith, as measured by Player won-lost records.

Andre Dawson Ozzie Smith
Season Games pWins pLoss Win Pct. pWOPA pWORL Games pWins pLoss Win Pct. pWOPA pWORL
1976242.53.40.425-0.5
-0.3
197713916.315.70.510-0.0
1.3
197815722.318.90.5421.4
2.9
15921.221.60.4950.52.1
197915522.718.90.5461.4
3.0
15617.418.90.479-0.11.3
198015122.418.80.5431.4
2.9
15821.421.00.5040.92.5
198110317.813.50.5691.8
3.0
11013.115.50.459-0.70.4
198214823.917.20.5823.0
4.6
14019.616.80.5381.93.3
198315923.220.10.5351.1
2.7
15920.217.80.5311.52.9
198413820.118.20.5250.1
1.5
12418.015.50.5381.93.2
198513920.717.60.5401.0
2.5
15822.518.20.5542.84.3
198613016.416.60.496-0.7
0.5
15318.916.70.5311.63.0
198715322.920.30.5300.5
2.2
15823.017.40.5703.44.9
198815721.618.90.5330.5
2.0
15322.617.80.5602.84.3
198911815.213.10.5370.6
1.7
15520.718.60.5271.63.0
199014719.820.20.495-0.7
0.8
14316.317.30.485-0.11.1
199114916.616.80.498-0.7
0.6
15020.717.70.5391.93.4
199214318.017.60.506-0.2
1.1
13218.516.80.5241.32.6
199312111.111.10.501-0.1
1.2
14118.618.20.5060.62.1
1994755.87.10.451-0.9
-0.0
9810.912.30.469-0.40.5
1995795.97.50.441-1.0
-0.5
444.75.60.453-0.40.0
1996421.72.00.453-0.2
0.0
827.56.80.5240.51.1
------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------
CAREER RECORDS2,627347.0313.40.5257.7
33.7
2,573335.8310.40.52021.245.9


Dawson and Smith are an interesting comparison. Their careers were almost exactly the same length so that both of them are thought of, I think, as something of career Hall-of-Fame candidates. But Andre Dawson had a wonderful peak when he was young, from about age 23 through 28 (1978 - 1983), and then hung around for quite a while as a decent - and, eventually, a below-average - guy.

In contrast, Ozzie Smith, while brilliant defensively from day one but could not hit major-league pitching worth a lick for several years. In 1979, for example, he won a "Reverse Triple Crown", finishing last in the National League (among batting qualifiers) in batting average (.211), home runs (0), and RBI (27). But Ozzie improved such that, by 1984, he was actually a slightly above-average batter (although that "average" included pitchers). Having finally figured out how to be at least competent as a hitter, while continuing to be an outstanding fielder, Smith had a later peak than Dawson, running from about age 27 through age 34 (1982 - 1989).

Their peaks end up barely overlapping, although for one season, 1983, they played the same number of games (159) and earned the same number of pWins over replacement level (2.9).

The last two tables here compare their careers from 1978 - 1982 - Dawson's peak before Smith really learned to hit - and then from 1984 - 1993, when Smith was at his best while Dawson was already heading (somewhat gracefully) into his decline phase.

1978 - 1982
Games pWins pLosses pWin Pct. pWOPA pWORL eWins eLosses eWin Pct. eWOPA eWORL
Andre Dawson
714
109.187.20.5568.9
16.4
108.487.90.5528.215.8
Ozzie Smith
723
92.793.90.4972.4
9.6
91.295.30.4890.98.1


1984 - 1993
Games pWins pLosses pWin Pct. pWOPA pWORL eWins eLosses eWin Pct. eWOPA eWORL
Andre Dawson
1395
182.5170.40.5170.4
14.1
185.3167.50.5253.217.0
Ozzie Smith
1467
199.9174.00.53517.7
31.8
195.2178.70.52213.027.1




All articles are written so that they pull data directly from the most recent version of the Player won-lost database. Hence, any numbers cited within these articles should automatically incorporate the most recent update to Player won-lost records. In some cases, however, the accompanying text may have been written based on previous versions of Player won-lost records. I apologize if this results in non-sensical text in any cases.

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