Baseball Player Won-Loss Records
Home     List of Articles



The 2012 Season as seen through the Prism of Player Won-Lost Records


Retrosheet has recently updated their play-by-play data to include 2012. I have updated my Player won-lost records to include the 2012 season. I thought it would be worthwhile to look through these new 2012 player won-lost records to see how the 2012 season looks as seen through Player won-lost records.

The Best of 2012

The top 10 players in pWins above Positional Average and Replacement Level were as follows.

pWins over Positional Average
Top 10 Players
          pWins over Replacement Level
Top 10 Players
Player pWins pLosses pWOPA pWORL           Player pWins pLosses pWOPA pWORL
1Robinson Cano23.417.33.4
5.4
1Robinson Cano23.417.33.4
5.4
2Buster Posey19.212.53.2
4.7
2Mike Trout22.415.53.2
5.0
3Mike Trout22.415.53.2
5.0
3Adam Jones24.018.02.7
4.8
4Yoenis Cespedes19.512.93.1
4.7
4Buster Posey19.212.53.2
4.7
5Adrian Beltre20.814.53.0
4.7
5Adrian Beltre20.814.53.0
4.7
6Adam Jones24.018.02.7
4.8
6Yoenis Cespedes19.512.93.1
4.7
7Clayton Kershaw15.011.32.6
3.9
7Chase Headley22.516.92.4
4.3
8Justin Verlander16.412.02.6
4.0
8Dan Uggla21.016.22.5
4.3
9Kris Medlen8.84.12.6
3.3
9Aramis Ramirez21.015.22.5
4.3
10Aramis Ramirez21.015.22.5
4.3
10Brandon Phillips20.816.62.2
4.0


The top 10 players in eWins above Positional Average and Replacement Level were as follows.

eWins over Positional Average
Top 10 Players
          eWins over Replacement Level
Top 10 Players
Player eWins eLosses eWOPA eWORL           Player eWins eLosses eWOPA eWORL
1Clayton Kershaw15.211.22.8
4.1
1Ryan J. Braun24.417.72.8
4.8
2Ryan J. Braun24.417.72.8
4.8
2Robinson Cano22.718.32.6
4.6
3Robinson Cano22.718.32.6
4.6
3Mike Trout21.815.92.6
4.5
4Mike Trout21.815.92.6
4.5
4Andrew McCutchen22.516.92.3
4.2
5Cliff P. Lee15.011.62.4
3.7
5Clayton Kershaw15.211.22.8
4.1
6Justin Verlander15.111.22.3
3.6
6Chase Headley21.916.92.1
4.0
7David Price13.39.42.3
3.4
7Miguel Cabrera22.318.12.0
3.9
8Andrew McCutchen22.516.92.3
4.2
8Adrian Beltre19.815.22.1
3.8
9Edwin Encarnacion17.412.22.2
3.7
9Cliff P. Lee15.011.62.4
3.7
10Giancarlo Stanton18.413.32.1
3.7
10Giancarlo Stanton18.413.32.1
3.7


Buster Posey won the National League MVP award fairly handily. Player won-lost records generally agrees, with Buster Posey leading all National League players in pWins above both average and replacement level.

There were, however, several other results that seem to warrant further investigation, including a fairly unusual take on the very interesting AL MVP race.
AL MVP Race: Miguel Cabrera v. Mike Trout
Miguel Cabrera was voted American League MVP on the strength of his having won the Triple Crown: leading the American League in batting average (.330), home runs (44), and RBIs (139). The overwhelming consensus of sabermetric commentators, however, was that Mike Trout deserved the award.

So what do Player won-lost records have to say about the Cabrera-Trout debate?

Let's start with the measure of Player won-lost records that is most similar to other sabermetric measures: eWins and eLosses, which are neutralized for context and teammate quality.

Batting Baserunning Fielding Positional
eWins eLosses eWins eLosses eWins eLosses Average Repl. Level
Miguel Cabrera17.0
12.4
1.0
1.0
4.3
5.0
0.5040.455
Mike Trout15.0
10.4
2.1
1.3
4.5
4.5
0.5070.459


Cabrera and Trout are basically dead even in net batting wins (eWins minus eLosses), with Cabrera having more eWins and eLosses, due to his extra 58 plate appearances. Trout breaks the tie with Cabrera, however, with better baserunning and better fielding (although, I notice that Player won-lost records aren't a huge fan of Trout's fielding). Third base and center field are pretty comparable positions in terms of average Player winning percentage, so there's nothing interesting there. Trout was better, although Cabrera makes up some of that gap if you measure vs. replacement level instead of average, because of his extra playing time.

But what about the argument that Cabrera should get credit for getting hot in the last two months and carrying the Tigers to the playoffs (and ultimately, the World Series), while the Angels missed the playoffs entirely. Moving from eWins to pWins puts the performances of Miguel Cabrera and Mike Trout in the context of how they contributed to team victories.

Games pWins pLosses pWin Pct. pWOPA pWORL eWins eLosses eWin Pct. eWOPA eWORL
Miguel Cabrera
161
22.518.20.5532.0
4.0
22.318.10.5522.03.9
Mike Trout
139
22.415.50.5913.2
5.0
21.815.90.5772.64.5

Context just increases Trout's lead.

AL MVP According to Player Won-Lost Records: Robinson Cano
So Mike Trout should have won the American League MVP award, based on Player won-lost records? Actually, no. It turns out, the best player in the American League, as measured by either pWins or eWins, above average or above replacement level, was actually Robinson Cano of the New York Yankees.

Here's how Cano compares to Trout.

Batting Baserunning Fielding Positional
eWins eLosses eWins eLosses eWins eLosses Average Repl. Level
Robinson Cano16.3
12.5
1.1
1.1
5.2
5.0
0.4900.442
Mike Trout15.0
10.4
2.1
1.3
4.5
4.5
0.5070.459

Trout has a better Batting winning percentage (0.590 to 0.565), but Cano beats him in quantity (Cano had the same number of plate appearances in 2012 as Miguel Cabrera). Trout is a better baserunner (by quite a lot), but (surprisingly, to me) Player won-lost records actually have Cano as the better fielder. Cano also gets credit for playing the position (2B) with the lower average winning percentage.

Put it all together, with and without context, and the comparison looks like this.

Games pWins pLosses pWin Pct. pWOPA pWORL eWins eLosses eWin Pct. eWOPA eWORL
Robinson Cano
161
23.417.30.5753.4
5.4
22.718.30.5552.64.6
Mike Trout
139
22.415.50.5913.2
5.0
21.815.90.5772.64.5


They're close, and I certainly don't think a vote for Trout over Cano would be a "mistake". In fact, if you think Player won-lost records are under-valuing Trout's defense (and that's my gut feeling here), you could probably push Trout ahead of Cano fairly easily. But if you take Player won-lost records at face value, there you are: Robinson Cano certainly has a strong argument that he should have won the American League MVP award.

Better in Context: Adam Jones, Yoenis Cespedes
Looking at the top 10 players in pWOPA and pWORL from the beginning of this article, two names that caught my eye were the top position players on the two most surprising playoff teams of 2012: Adam Jones of the Baltimore Orioles and Yoenis Cespedes of the Oakland A's.

The table below shows Player won-lost records for Adam Jones and Yoenis Cespedes both in and out of context.

Games pWins pLosses pWin Pct. pWOPA pWORL eWins eLosses eWin Pct. eWOPA eWORL
Adam Jones
162
24.018.00.5722.7
4.8
22.419.00.5401.43.4
Yoenis Cespedes
129
19.512.90.6023.1
4.7
17.013.80.5531.42.9


The Baltimore Orioles competed with the New York Yankees for the AL East Division title down to the last day of the season. Yet, for most of the season, the Orioles were outscored by their opponents. Comparing their pWins and (context-neutral) eWins, the Orioles won 11.4 more games than would have been expected given their context-neutral stats. Based on the context of his performance, Adam Jones was personally responsible for 1.4 of these extra wins, (12.1%).

As one example of the Orioles' "clutchiness" and Adam Jones's part in it, the Orioles had an incredible 16-2 record in extra-inning games. In extra innings, Adam Jones batted .292/.393/.833, an OPS of 1.226, with 4 home runs and 10 RBIs in 28 plate appearances over 15 games. Overall, in the Orioles 16 extra-inning wins, Jones drove in the winning run 5 times (4 via home run) and scored the winning run another 4 times. Yep, he scored or drove in the winning run in over half of the Orioles' extra-inning wins!

As impressive as Jones was in context, Cespedes might have been even better. His OPS by leverage (high/med/low): 1.067/0.959/0.688. His OPS in extra innings: 1.500.

Adam Jones played every game for the Orioles in 2012, so it's impossible to say how much worse off the team would have done without him. Yoenis Cespedes, on the other hand, missed 33 games in 2012. And how did the A's do without him in the lineup? They went 12-21 without him (12-22 in games he didn't start). That translates into a 59-103 record over 162 games. With Cespedes in the starting lineup, the A's went 82-46, the equivalent of a 104-58 record over 162 games. Fluke? Sure, and I'm not suggesting he was worth an extra 35 wins or anything like that. But the timing of his hits, like those of Jones, translated into real wins for his team.

Worse in Context: Ryan Braun, Andrew McCutchen
While some players, such as Adam Jones and Yoenis Cespedes, were better in context than their raw context-neutral statistics might suggest, the reverse was also true. Some players' statistics did not translate into team victories to the extent that might have been expected. Two players who appear in the top 10 lists for eWOPA and eWORL at the top of this article but not for pWOPA and pWORL are Ryan Braun of the Milwaukee Brewers and Andrew McCutchen of the Pittsburgh Pirates.

Games pWins pLosses pWin Pct. pWOPA pWORL eWins eLosses eWin Pct. eWOPA eWORL
Ryan Braun
154
21.918.10.5471.3
3.3
24.417.70.5792.84.8
Andrew McCutchen
157
22.018.00.5501.4
3.4
22.516.90.5722.34.2


Neither the Milwaukee Brewers (26.6 pWins, 28.3 eWins) nor the Pittsburgh Pirates (22.6 pWins, 22.9 eWins) were notably good or bad at converting expected wins into actual wins. What the two teams did have in common, however, was that both teams' best player looks worse in context.

Ryan Braun's OPS by leverage (high/med/low) in 2012 was .894/.997/1.007. None of those numbers are bad, of course, they'd just be a bit more valuable if they were reversed.

The numbers aren't quite as dramatic for Andrew McCutchen (high/med/low), .885/1.066/.900. Again, an .885 OPS in high-leverage situations is well above-average, just not up to the level of McCutchen's overall OPS of .953.

Where Did That Come From? Kris Medlen
In the top 10 lists for pWOPA and pWORL above, only one player appears who had fewer than 15 pWins: Kris Medlen. From my perspective, the greatness of Kris Medlen's season really came out of nowhere. I only became vaguely aware that he was even having a great season some time in either August or September.

Looking at Kris Medlen's career through 2011, it's easy to see why I didn't see this coming. Up to that point, he had amassed a career pWin-pLoss record of 8.7 - 8.4, good for 0.4 pWOPA and 1.4 pWORL.

Then 2012 happened and Kris Medlen put up this line.

Games pWins pLosses pWin Pct. pWOPA pWORL eWins eLosses eWin Pct. eWOPA eWORL
Kris Medlen
50
8.84.10.6842.6
3.3
8.04.90.6231.82.5


Earning 2.6 pWOPA on only 8.8 pWins is remarkable and struck me as probably being pretty damn rare. In fact, here are all of the players who have earned 2.5 or more pWOPA in a season in which they amassed fewer than 9.0 pWins since 1938.

pWOPA>2.5, pWins<9
Player Team Season pWins pLosses pWOPA pWORL
Tim BurkeMON7.62.52.7
3.3
Eric GagneLAN8.32.72.6
3.4
Kris MedlenATL8.84.12.6
3.3
Frankie RodriguezANA8.83.22.6
3.4
Rod BeckSFN8.63.42.5
3.3
Heath BellSDN8.73.42.5
3.4
Same Team, Different Context: Aramis Ramirez v. Ryan Braun
Finally, in looking at the top 10 lists at the top of this article, I noticed that a Milwaukee Brewer made the top 10 in both eWORL and pWORL. But it was a different Brewer on the two lists: Aramis Ramirez at #9 on the pWORL list and Ryan Braun at #1 in eWORL, but nowhere to be found on the pWORL list.

That's kind of interesting: Braun was clearly the better Brewer, but Aramis Ramirez might have been the most valuable Brewer.

Games pWins pLosses pWin Pct. pWOPA pWORL eWins eLosses eWin Pct. eWOPA eWORL
Ryan Braun
154
21.918.10.5471.3
3.3
24.417.70.5792.84.8
Aramis Ramirez
149
21.015.20.5812.5
4.3
19.315.30.5571.63.3


As noted above, the Brewers as a team were not particularly noteworthy in terms of eWins vs. pWins, in either a good or a bad way. But what about Braun and Ramirez?

Looking at Ryan Braun's batting splits, one can see some un-clutchiness if you look for it. As noted above, his OPS by leverage (high/med/low) was .894/.997/1.007. Of course, an OPS of .894 is nothing to sneeze at; it's just not the .987 that Braun put up overall. Similarly, with two outs and runners in scoring position, Braun's OPS was .900; late and close, it was .951; in extra innings, it was .866. Overall, Ryan Braun came to bat with 402 teammates on base; he drove in 71 of them (17.7%).

Looking at Aramis Ramirez's splits, you can see the opposite (if you go looking for it). Late and close, his OPS was .998; in extra innings, it was 1.194. Overall, Aramis Ramirez came to bat with 418 teammates on base; he drove in 78 of them, or 18.7%.

Does this mean that Aramis Ramirez was a better baseball player in 2012 than Ryan Braun? No. Does this mean that Aramis Ramirez had a better season in 2012 than Braun? Maybe. Does this mean that Aramis Ramirez's performance translated into team victories at a better rate than Ryan Braun's? Yeah, probably.

2012 Postseason

The 2012 postseason began with the first-ever wild-card play-in games, which were highlighted by a disputed invocation of the infield fly rule. It ended with the San Francisco Giants winning their second World Series in three years.

Overall, the best players in the 2012 postseason, as measured by pWins over replacement level were Ryan Vogelsong and Gregor Blanco.

2012 Postseason: Total
pWins pLosses pWORL
Ryan VogelsongSFN2.10.90.8
Gregor BlancoSFN2.51.20.8


Top postseason players by round were as follows.

2012 Postseason: World Series
pWins pLosses pWORL
Gregor BlancoSFN1.00.30.4
Pablo SandovalSFN1.00.30.4

2012 Postseason: League Championship Series
pWins pLosses pWORL
Marco ScutaroSFN1.60.80.5
Ryan VogelsongSFN1.20.50.5
Delmon YoungDET1.00.30.4
Matt CarpenterSLN0.80.10.4

2012 Postseason: Division Series
pWins pLosses pWORL
C.C. SabathiaNYA1.70.50.7
Justin VerlanderDET1.40.40.6

2012 Postseason: Wild Card Round
pWins pLosses pWORL
Joe SaundersBAL0.50.10.2
Matt HollidaySLN0.40.00.2
Kyle LohseSLN0.50.30.2


Best of 2012 by Factor and Position

Next, let's look at the top players in (context-neutral, teammate-adjusted) eWins over Positional Average in various aspects of the game.
Best by Factor: Batting, Baserunning, Pitching, Fielding
There are four basic factors for which players earn Player won-lost records: Batting, Baserunning, Pitching, and Fielding. The top players in 2012 in eWOPA by factor were as follows.

Batting
eWins eLosses eWOPA
Ryan J. Braun16.611.32.4
Edwin Encarnacion15.010.22.3
Miguel Cabrera17.012.42.2
Mike Trout15.010.42.2
Andrew McCutchen15.711.02.1
Prince Fielder15.811.52.1
Joey Votto11.36.92.1

Positional Average excludes pitcher offense



Baserunning
eWins eLosses eWOPA
Tony Campana1.30.40.4
Coco Crisp1.50.80.4
Mike Trout2.11.30.4
Desmond Jennings1.30.60.4

Positional Average excludes pitcher offense



Pitching
eWins eLosses Net Wins
Clayton Kershaw12.69.23.4
Kris Medlen7.44.33.1
David Price11.68.72.9
Justin Verlander13.110.42.7
Felix Hernandez12.710.32.4


Fielding, P
eWins eLosses Net Wins
Cliff P. Lee1.20.30.9


Fielding, C
eWins eLosses Net Wins
Salvador Perez1.20.70.6


Fielding, 1B
eWins eLosses Net Wins
Adrian Gonzalez3.12.30.8


Fielding, 2B
eWins eLosses Net Wins
Darwin Barney5.54.21.3


Fielding, 3B
eWins eLosses Net Wins
David Wright5.04.20.8


Fielding, SS
eWins eLosses Net Wins
J.J. Hardy6.85.81.0


Fielding, LF
eWins eLosses Net Wins
Martin Prado4.23.30.9


Fielding, CF
eWins eLosses Net Wins
Michael Bourn5.64.41.2


Fielding, RF
eWins eLosses Net Wins
Alexis Rios7.15.61.5


Best by Position
Next, we look at 2012 Major-League leaders in eWOPA by position. The figures shown here only include Player decisions earned while playing this particular position, and include no contextual adjustments (expected or actual).

Catcher
eWins eLosses eWOPA
Yadier Molina15.212.21.5
Carlos Ruiz11.78.81.5
Buster Posey13.710.81.5


First Base
eWins eLosses eWOPA
Joey Votto14.29.91.7


Second Base
eWins eLosses eWOPA
Robinson Cano21.517.82.3


Third Base
eWins eLosses eWOPA
Chase Headley21.817.02.0


Shortstop
eWins eLosses eWOPA
Asdrubal Cabrera18.216.81.2


Left Field
eWins eLosses eWOPA
Ryan J. Braun24.017.92.5


Center Field
eWins eLosses eWOPA
Andrew McCutchen22.517.02.2


Incidentally, Mike Trout was 2nd in center field eWOPA, in 110 games, and 8th in left field eWOPA, in only 67 games (29 starts).

Right Field
eWins eLosses eWOPA
Giancarlo Stanton18.213.32.1


Starting Pitcher
eWins eLosses eWOPA
Clayton Kershaw12.99.52.0
Cliff P. Lee13.010.01.8


Coming in just below David Price in eWOPA as a starting pitcher is Justin Verlander. A comparison of these two players makes for an interesting contrast between wins over average versus wins over replacement.

The next table compares Price and Verlander in raw context-neutral pitching wins. Verlander has more raw wins, but Price has a better winning percentage.

Starting Pitcher
eWins eLosses Win Pct. eWOPA
David Price11.99.00.5691.7
Justin Verlander13.410.70.5561.6


Raw pitching wins are converted into overall player wins by incorporating context (expected in the case of eWins, actual in the case of pWins), as well as pitcher offense (which is a fairly trivial consideration for two American League pitchers). The results for Price and Verlander are shown next.

Games pWins pLosses pWin Pct. pWOPA pWORL eWins eLosses eWin Pct. eWOPA eWORL
David Price
31
13.79.60.5882.3
3.5
13.39.40.5862.263.4
Justin Verlander
33
16.412.00.5772.6
4.0
15.111.20.5732.283.6


David Price just barely edged out Justin Verlander for the American League Cy Young award. Using Player won-lost record as a guide, the question of whether that was a good call depends on whether you prefer wins over average (WOPA) or wins over replacement (WORL) (and whether you prefer eWins or pWins) and by how much.

Relief Pitcher
eWins eLosses eWOPA
Fernando Rodney4.52.11.0


Two other relief pitchers besides Rodney had particularly noteworthy 2012 seasons: Craig Kimbrel, who struck out over half of the batters he faced (116 of 231), and Aroldis Chapman, who struck out 122 batters in 71.2 innings.

For relief pitchers, context-neutral records may not be the best measure of how good they are, as context can matter a great deal, depending on how a pitcher is used. Here are how Rodney, Kimbrel, and Chapman compare in context, in terms of pWins and pWOPA.

Top Relief Pitcher in Context
pWins pLosses pWOPA
Craig Kimbrel7.12.42.1
Fernando Rodney7.73.32.0
Aroldis Chapman7.43.91.5


Designated Hitter
eWins eLosses eWOPA
Edwin Encarnacion8.56.01.1
David Ortiz8.76.31.0


2012 was something of a down year for the use of full-time DHs. The top DH in eWOPA, Edwin Encarnacion, only played the position in 82 games, amassing fewer than 10 Player wins at the position.

Finally, here are the best at three oft-forgotten positions that can nevertheless matter: pitcher offense, pinch hitting, and pinch running.

Pitcher Offense
eWins eLosses eWOPA
Mike Leake1.21.20.5


Pinch Hitter
eWins eLosses eWOPA
Travis Buck1.20.20.5


Pinch Runner
eWins eLosses eWOPA
Carlos Gomez0.40.00.2


Noteworthy Players of 2012

Finally, let's take a look at some players who had noteworthy 2012 seasons.
Hello Young
One of the big storylines of 2012 was the influx of great young talent. Two players in particular caught the attention of Major League Baseball fans everywhere based partly on the impressive seasons they had, but also, based on how young they were while having these seasons.

Bryce Harper burst onto the scene for the Washington Nationals at the tender age of 19 and put up a season that was good enough to win him the National League Rookie of the Year award. It was also a season that ranked among the best ever for a 19-year-old. The table below shows the records of every player who earned at least 20 Player decisions in his 19-year-old season, sorted by pWORL.

Best 19-Year-Olds of the Retrosheet Era
Player Team Season pWins pLosses pWOPA pWORL
Dwight GoodenNYN16.511.73.2
4.4
Wally BunkerBAL13.810.72.1
3.5
Gary NolanCIN15.412.51.9
3.3
Bryce HarperWAS19.416.01.2
2.9
Mickey MantleNYA13.19.31.7
2.8
Bob FellerCLE15.314.60.8
2.5
Ray SadeckiSLN11.611.40.6
1.7
Larry DierkerHOU11.010.70.6
1.6
Bert BlylevenMIN10.410.60.3
1.3
Tony ConigliaroBOS13.413.0-0.4
1.2
Ken Griffey Jr.SEA14.715.2-0.2
1.1
Mike McCormickSFN11.112.2-0.1
1.0
Cesar CedenoHOU11.211.3-0.4
1.0
Robin YountMIL15.318.8-0.8
0.8
Al KalineDET14.216.1-1.1
0.6
Ted KazanskiPHI9.211.1-0.7
0.4
Rusty StaubHOU15.917.8-1.6
0.2
Ed KranepoolNYN10.412.5-1.6
-0.2
Bobby Del GrecoPIT8.812.5-2.0
-0.8


By pWORL, Bryce Harper had the 4th-best season by a 19-year-old in the past 60+ years. Not bad at all.

Meanwhile, in the American League, there was a player who was one year older than Harper making a lot of noise too.

Best 20-Year-Olds of the Retrosheet Era
Player Team Season pWins pLosses pWOPA pWORL
Dwight GoodenNYN22.011.06.5
8.2
Alex RodriguezSEA21.916.43.5
5.4
Mickey MantleNYA21.914.93.1
5.2
Mike TroutANA22.415.53.2
5.0
Fernando ValenzuelaLAN15.510.63.2
4.5
Al KalineDET22.717.71.7
3.9
Claudell WashingtonOAK21.917.51.9
3.8
Bert BlylevenMIN18.215.82.0
3.6
Frank RobinsonCIN22.417.91.3
3.6
Milt PappasBAL14.611.81.9
3.2
Bryce HarperWAS17.413.31.7
3.2
Vada PinsonCIN23.821.20.6
3.1
Roberto AlomarSDN19.316.51.5
3.1
Don DrysdaleBRO14.612.21.8
3.1
Dave RozemaDET13.09.51.9
3.0
Jason HeywardATL20.216.41.2
3.0
Manny MachadoBAL19.817.61.1
2.9
Jerry WalkerBAL12.710.31.6
2.8
Ray SadeckiSLN15.914.61.3
2.8
Andruw JonesATL17.013.91.2
2.7
Rick AnkielSLN13.011.71.3
2.7
Ted WilliamsBOS13.810.51.2
2.6
Don GullettCIN14.012.51.3
2.6
Johnny BenchCIN15.013.61.0
2.6
Dennis EckersleyCLE12.39.71.4
2.4
Butch WynegarMIN15.113.81.1
2.4
Alan TrammellDET14.013.01.1
2.4
Hank AaronMLN17.014.90.5
2.3
Cesar CedenoHOU20.719.5-0.0
2.2
Jim PalmerBAL14.614.00.8
2.2
C.C. SabathiaCLE11.510.11.0
2.2
Elvis AndrusTEX15.414.70.7
2.1
Willie MaysNY115.113.30.6
2.1


Goodbye Old
At the opposite extreme from Harper and Trout were the two oldest players to appear in Major League Baseball in 2012: 45-year-old Omar Vizquel and 49-year-old Jamie Moyer. Vizquel has already announced that 2012 was his last season. It is probably also the end of the line for Moyer as well. Here is how the recently-completed careers of Vizquel and Moyer look in Player won-lost records.

Omar Vizquel Jamie Moyer
Year Games Wins Losses Win Pct. pWOPA pWORL Games Wins Losses Win Pct. pWOPA pWORL
1986
 
166.46.30.5050.30.9
1987
 
3912.615.80.445-0.80.6
1988
 
3411.113.80.445-0.90.3
1989
14310.713.40.442-1.0
0.1
154.66.50.417-0.8-0.3
1990
817.08.90.441-0.7
0.1
334.04.90.453-0.50.0
1991
14213.713.20.5100.7
1.9
81.42.80.339-0.6-0.4
1992
13614.516.90.462-0.6
0.9
1993
15817.119.30.470-0.5
1.2
259.47.20.5661.22.0
1994
697.39.00.449-0.5
0.3
237.17.50.484-0.20.7
1995
13617.715.00.5412.0
3.6
276.25.90.5110.20.9
1996
15117.017.10.4980.5
2.2
348.47.00.5460.81.7
1997
15317.516.60.5121.1
2.7
3012.310.00.5521.42.7
1998
15118.017.40.5080.9
2.6
3414.611.90.5511.63.1
1999
14421.115.60.5753.4
5.2
3213.010.70.5491.42.6
2000
15616.917.40.4930.3
2.1
269.89.70.5020.21.2
2001
15515.817.20.479-0.2
1.6
3313.49.00.5992.53.7
2002
15118.718.50.5030.6
2.5
3412.510.60.5411.22.4
2003
648.37.90.5120.4
1.2
3313.89.60.5892.33.7
2004
14816.817.50.4890.0
1.7
3410.513.10.444-1.00.3
2005
15217.017.70.490-0.2
1.5
3211.810.30.5341.02.1
2006
15318.018.60.492-0.1
1.6
3312.313.00.4860.01.4
2007
14514.116.50.461-1.2
0.3
3412.314.90.453-0.50.9
2008
926.38.40.429-0.9
-0.2
3311.811.00.5181.02.3
2009
625.04.10.5500.5
0.9
309.611.80.447-0.60.6
2010
10810.19.90.5050.2
1.1
196.78.70.437-0.70.1
2011
584.86.10.443-0.5
-0.0
2012
603.34.70.414-0.6
-0.2
103.44.80.416-0.5-0.1
------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------
CAREER RECORDS2,968316.8327.00.4923.5
34.9
701239.2236.70.5038.133.7


And Finally, Farewell to a Hall of Famer
Finally, 2012 was the final season in at least one (highly probable) Hall of Fame career: Chipper Jones. For his career, Jones is among the top 20 players in both pWOPA and pWORL among players for whom I have calculated Player won-lost records.

Basic Player Won-Lost Records
Value Decomposition
Season Team Age Games pWins pLosses pWin Pct. pWOPA pWORL eWins eLosses eWin Pct. eWOPA eWORL
1993ATL21
7
0.00.00.176-0.0
-0.0
0.20.10.7380.10.1
1995ATL23
140
20.115.80.5601.8
3.5
17.416.00.5220.42.0
1996ATL24
157
22.316.70.5712.6
4.5
21.316.60.5622.14.0
1997ATL25
157
20.917.40.5451.4
3.3
19.817.20.5341.02.8
1998ATL26
160
23.916.00.5983.6
5.6
22.317.00.5662.34.2
1999ATL27
157
22.715.30.5973.5
5.4
21.716.30.5722.54.4
2000ATL28
156
21.216.20.5672.4
4.4
20.416.40.5541.93.9
2001ATL29
159
20.716.10.5632.0
4.0
20.715.70.5692.24.2
2002ATL30
158
24.217.60.5792.5
4.6
22.517.20.5661.83.8
2003ATL31
153
21.217.20.5521.2
3.1
19.917.50.5320.42.3
2004ATL32
137
17.113.10.5671.5
3.1
15.513.10.5430.82.2
2005ATL33
109
16.210.60.6052.6
3.8
13.910.20.5751.62.7
2006ATL34
110
13.512.30.5230.2
1.5
15.011.90.5581.22.5
2007ATL35
134
19.514.40.5772.2
3.8
19.213.80.5832.43.9
2008ATL36
128
15.812.20.5641.5
2.8
16.812.00.5832.13.5
2009ATL37
143
16.214.50.5290.7
2.2
15.514.70.5140.21.7
2010ATL38
95
12.29.50.5641.3
2.3
10.99.20.5430.81.7
2011ATL39
126
15.112.90.5401.1
2.5
14.713.00.5310.92.2
2012ATL40
112
14.211.50.5531.1
2.3
13.211.70.5310.51.7
------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------
CAREER (reg. season)
2,498
337.2259.30.56533.2
62.6
320.8259.40.55325.253.7
------ ------ ------ ------ ------
PostSeason (career)
93
11.610.90.516 1.311.410.90.512 1.2
------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------
COMBINED
2,591
348.8270.20.565
63.8
332.2270.30.553 54.9



Home     List of Articles