Baseball Player Won-Loss Records
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David Eckstein

2016 Hall of Fame Ballot Series: David Eckstein

The first table below presents David Eckstein's career as measured by Player won-lost records.

David Eckstein
Basic Player Won-Lost Records
Value Decomposition
Season Team Age Games pWins pLosses pWin Pct. pWOPA pWORL eWins eLosses eWin Pct. eWOPA eWORL
2001ANA26
153
17.118.50.481-0.3
1.3
17.117.60.4930.21.7
2002ANA27
152
20.518.90.5211.3
2.9
20.119.60.5070.82.4
2003ANA28
120
12.814.90.463-0.7
0.4
12.413.80.474-0.40.7
2004ANA29
142
16.517.00.4920.2
1.5
15.217.40.466-0.70.6
2005SLN30
158
22.619.50.5371.8
3.4
20.519.90.5070.52.0
2006SLN31
123
14.315.30.482-0.4
0.7
14.115.10.482-0.40.6
2007SLN32
117
14.014.10.4990.0
1.0
13.113.70.490-0.30.7
33
93
9.510.90.466-0.5
0.3
9.911.10.471-0.40.4
2009SDN34
136
15.514.40.5180.4
1.5
14.415.90.475-0.90.2
2010SDN35
116
13.312.80.5090.2
1.2
13.113.80.487-0.40.6
------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------
CAREER (reg. season)
1,310
156.1156.20.5002.2
14.2
149.9157.90.487-1.810.0
------ ------ ------ ------ ------
PostSeason (career)
44
6.15.40.533 0.95.55.90.484 0.3
------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------
COMBINED
1,354
162.2161.60.500
15.1
155.5163.80.487 10.4


Probably the most striking thing about David Eckstein's career, as measured by Player won-lost records, is that he looks much better in context (pWins) than when the context is neutralized (eWins). In fact, in context, David Eckstein was somewhat above average for his career, 2.2 pWins over positional average; while, controlling for context, Eckstein was somewhat below average, -1.8 eWOPA. The same pattern is true - and, in fact, even more extreme - in Eckstein's 44 postseason games.

I discuss the contextual factors that distinguish pWins from eWins in detail here. Over-simplifying somewhat, players may accumulate a higher winning percentage in pWins than eWins in two possible ways. Either a player had the good fortune to play on good teams - i.e., they tended to have good teammates, who helped to convert the player's positive contributions into wins and save the player's negative contributions from leading to losses - or the player performed better in more win-important situations - i.e., the player was "clutch".

In the case of David Eckstein, both of these things were true.

Eckstein spent most of his career with very good teams. In ten seasons, he appeared in the postseason four times and won two World Series.

But David Eckstein also performed better in the clutch over the course of his career. For example, for his career, David Eckstein had a regular-season OPS of .701. In late-and-close situations, that rose to .737. In high-leverage situations, Eckstein's OPS was .734 versus .684 in low-leverage situations. In the postseason, Eckstein's overall OPS was .680. In the World Series, it was .767.
The table below shows the non-pitchers with the largest gap between pWins and eWins over replacement level since 1969 in combined regular-season and postseason games.



Highest Career (pWORL - eWORL), Non-Pitchers

Player Games pWins pLosses pWOPA pWORL eWins eLosses eWOPA eWORL
Mark Lemke
1,065
110.7106.52.5
11.1
104.3113.0-3.94.7
David Bell
1,402
145.2145.7-0.8
10.5
142.0152.6-5.95.6
Mark T. McLemore
1,796
200.2205.2-0.1
16.2
191.8210.1-6.79.4
Brooks Robinson
1,013
120.5107.64.8
13.9
110.4108.2-0.58.3
Sandy Alomar Sr.
1,033
108.6109.12.5
11.2
103.8112.2-1.57.2
Mark Belanger
1,613
157.6149.011.4
23.5
154.5163.52.915.4
Terry Pendleton
1,892
235.6217.65.4
23.0
220.2216.7-1.715.3
Mike Gallego
1,105
96.791.74.4
11.7
97.9101.40.27.9
Juan Uribe
1,822
199.0186.87.2
21.8
192.0193.70.314.8
Mariano Duncan
1,273
150.1150.31.8
13.4
146.1154.7-2.49.2


2016 Hall of Fame Ballot Series




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