Baseball Player Won-Loss Records
Home     List of Articles



Bill Freehan
Bill Freehan as Seen Through Player Won-Lost Records

Bill Freehan played fifteen seasons for the Detroit Tigers, mostly at catcher. He was the starting catcher on their 1968 World Championship team and was arguably the best non-pitcher in the major leagues that season. During his career, Bill Freehan won five Gold Gloves and received MVP votes six times, with three top 10 finishes, including back-to-back finishes of 3rd and 2nd in 1967 and 1968. He was named to 11 All-Star teams in his 15-year career. This gives him the distinction of the most All-Star appearances for any player who retired before 2000 who is eligible for but not in the Hall of Fame.

Bill Freehan was elected to the Hall of Merit in his 4th year of eligibility. How does Bill Freehan stack up as a possible Hall-of-Fame candidate when his career is evaluated by Player won-lost records?

The first table below presents Bill Freehan's career as measured by Player won-lost records.

Bill Freehan
Basic Player Won-Lost Records
Value Decomposition
Season Team Age Games pWins pLosses pWin Pct. pWOPA pWORL eWins eLosses eWin Pct. eWOPA eWORL
1961DET19
4
0.50.20.6520.1
0.1
0.40.30.5530.00.1
1963DET21
98
6.77.60.469-0.5
0.1
7.47.00.5140.20.7
1964DET22
144
14.012.80.5230.8
1.8
14.712.10.5491.52.5
1965DET23
130
12.111.50.5120.6
1.6
11.611.90.4940.21.1
1966DET24
136
11.511.30.5040.2
1.1
11.211.50.493-0.00.9
1967DET25
155
16.813.20.5602.2
3.5
17.412.50.5812.94.1
1968DET26
155
19.413.10.5963.2
4.6
18.813.70.5792.74.0
1969DET27
143
11.711.90.4960.1
1.1
12.411.20.5240.71.8
1970DET28
115
9.89.30.5120.3
1.1
9.59.60.4980.00.8
1971DET29
148
13.912.20.5331.0
2.0
13.912.20.5341.02.0
1972DET30
111
12.810.10.5601.5
2.4
12.510.30.5481.22.1
1973DET31
110
8.710.40.457-0.6
0.2
9.39.80.487-0.00.8
1974DET32
130
13.712.50.5230.6
1.6
14.212.00.5421.12.1
1975DET33
120
10.511.70.474-0.4
0.5
11.111.10.4990.21.0
1976DET34
71
4.96.40.435-0.6
-0.1
5.65.80.4920.10.5
------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------
CAREER (reg. season)
1,770
167.0154.20.5208.5
21.5
170.1151.00.53011.624.6
------ ------ ------ ------ ------
PostSeason (career)
10
1.21.10.529 0.20.91.00.479 0.0
------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------
COMBINED
1,780
168.2155.20.520
21.7
171.0152.00.530 24.7


Bill Freehan versus Hall of Fame Catchers
The most straightforward analysis of Bill Freehan's Hall-of-Fame case would seem to be to compare his career record to that of the catchers who are actually in the Hall of Fame. The next table compares Bill Freehan's career Player won-lost record to all of the post-World War II catchers who have been named to the Hall of Fame.

Bill Freehan vs. Hall-of-Fame Catchers
Player Games pWins pLosses pWOPA pWORL eWins eLosses eWOPA eWORL
Bill Freehan1,770167.0154.28.5
21.5
170.1151.011.624.6
--------------------------------------------------
Yogi Berra2,119245.3182.332.6
50.1
232.1195.519.537.0
Johnny Bench2,158245.9197.324.6
42.3
244.8198.423.541.2
Carlton Fisk2,498250.8219.821.2
39.9
250.6220.021.039.7
Mike Piazza1,911213.0174.222.7
38.6
214.3172.824.040.0
Bill Dickey1,623170.3127.124.6
37.1
163.0134.417.329.8
Mickey Cochrane1,321149.5109.822.4
33.2
143.0116.216.026.8
Gary Carter2,293241.4215.914.6
32.1
245.5211.718.736.3
Gabby Hartnett1,719165.3131.019.5
32.0
161.8134.516.028.5
Roy Campanella1,215126.594.517.3
26.3
121.599.412.321.3
Ivan Rodriguez2,543233.3234.27.8
26.2
237.1230.411.630.0
Ernie Lombardi1,834159.2147.69.1
22.1
163.1143.613.026.0
Rick Ferrell1,640130.8138.8-1.3
9.9
136.6133.04.515.7


Honestly, that table isn't terribly favorable to Bill Freehan. It's hard to point to a Hall-of-Fame catcher whose career took place mostly in the past seventy years that had a worse career than Bill Freehan. Freehan's case would seem to be less an argument that Bill Freehan is better than some catchers already in the Hall of Fame and more of an argument that there are too few catchers currently in the Hall of Fame.

Bill Freehan: Best Catcher of the 1960's?
Probably the strongest "conventional" argument in favor of putting Bill Freehan in the Hall of Fame is the 11 All-Star teams that he was named to in his 15-year career. Obviously, All-Star team appearances are an imperfect measure of actual quality, but (a) it's hard to make 11 All-Star teams without deserving at least several of them and (b) Bill Freehan did, in fact, deserve to be on the American League all-star team many, probably most, of those seasons.

Building on the implicit argument that comes out of the last section - there are too few catchers in the Hall of Fame - the argument for Bill Freehan can be distilled down to an argument that he was the best catcher in the major leagues between Yogi Berra - whose last season as a regular catcher was 1959 - and Johnny Bench - whose first season as a regular catcher was 1968. Limiting the comparison to the American League, Bill Freehan was (arguably) the best catcher in the American League between Berra and Carlton Fisk.

Or, to simplify somewhat for the benefit of pretty round numbers, the Hall-of-Fame case for Bill Freehan is that he was the best catcher in the 1960s.

Is that true? The next table ranks every player who earned at least 50 eWins as a catcher between 1960 and 1969, ranked by total pWORL accumulated in the 1960s.

Best Major-League Catchers of the 1960s
Player Games pWins pLosses pWOPA pWORL eWins eLosses eWOPA eWORL
Joe Torre1,196130.5111.68.6
18.5
131.4110.79.519.4
Elston Howard1,07099.686.87.7
15.3
96.889.74.812.4
Johnny Roseboro1,268107.2100.15.4
13.9
103.9103.42.210.6
Bill Freehan96592.581.66.8
13.9
93.980.38.115.2
Tom Haller1,03991.182.85.8
13.0
91.982.06.613.7
Tim McCarver96886.781.14.5
11.4
84.783.12.59.4
Johnny Romano84974.565.85.4
11.1
76.464.07.212.9
Earl Battey99084.980.53.5
10.1
85.280.23.810.4
Jim Pagliaroni84863.960.42.8
7.9
65.758.64.69.7
Johnny Edwards98676.876.31.5
7.7
75.877.20.66.8
Joe Azcue78063.060.12.7
7.7
60.762.40.35.3
Randy Hundley62053.754.41.0
5.4
53.854.21.15.5
Clay Dalrymple1,04071.779.5-2.7
3.5
73.677.5-0.75.5
Buck Rodgers93269.582.5-5.1
1.0
70.181.9-4.61.5


One might be tempted to point out that the above table actually underrates Bill Freehan, given that he didn't become a regular catcher until 1963 and that he continued to be an above-average major-league player until 1974. In fact, however, if you push the time frame back to coincide more perfectly with Bill Freehan's career (a) it becomes a lot more obvious cherry-picking and (b) Freehan's career overlaps significantly with Johnny Bench, who was a much better catcher and baseball player in general.

So, was Bill Freehan the best catcher of the 1960s?

I would say probably not. Based on the above table, that would be Joe Torre, who added an MVP award in 1971 that I think he probably deserved (as a third baseman). Bill Freehan does have a case as the best catcher in the American League of the 1960s. And if one thinks that the Hall of Fame should be inducting an average of two players per position per decade, then Freehan certainly at least belongs in the conversation for deserving the second slot for the 1960s (see, e.g., his eWOPA and eWORL totals).

Players Most Similar to Bill Freehan
I recently added a tool to my website that calculates which players are most similar to a particular player in career Player won-lost records. The next table shows the ten most similar players to Bill Freehan in career Player won-lost records.

Most Similar Players to Bill Freehan in Value
Ages 0 through 50 (seasons normalized to 162 games) (missing player games extrapolated)
Wins over Baseline
Player Games eWins eLosses eWOPA eWORL Bat Run Pitch Field
Bill Freehan
1770
170.1151.011.6
24.6
6.6-0.30.02.4
Darrell Porter
1769
158.6142.710.4
22.6
6.4-0.00.02.4
Thurman Munson
1423
150.7136.59.4
21.1
4.40.10.02.6
Ernie Lombardi
1834
163.1143.613.0
26.0
7.2-0.30.01.2
Roy Campanella
1215
121.599.412.3
21.3
7.6-0.30.02.1
Troy Glaus
1536
179.7158.49.4
22.7
9.00.00.02.8
Joe Mauer
1858
183.5162.911.2
25.1
8.10.70.01.6
Rico Carty
1650
179.1154.17.6
23.5
10.9-0.20.00.8
Buster Posey
1144
125.1104.910.4
18.9
6.6-0.10.01.9
Ted Kluszewski
1714
172.6150.35.7
19.0
8.30.00.00.6
Oscar Gamble
1575
146.9127.97.0
19.8
9.6-0.50.01.4


As Hall-of-Fame arguments go, this one isn't terribly strong. Of the ten players whose careers were most similar to Bill Freehan, two of them are in the Hall of Fame, although Ernie Lombardi has a somewhat weak Hall-of-Fame case and Roy Campanella had a very short career in the (integrated) major-leagues.

The top player Freehan's most-similar list here strikes me as a really good comp.

Bill Freehan vs. Darrell Porter
The closest statistical comp to Bill Freehan, based on career Player won-lost records, was former Brewers, Royals, and Cardinals catcher Darrell Porter. Freehan played one more game than Porter in their respective careers (note: I only count games where a player actually appears in the game, not games where he may be announced as a pinch-hitter who is then pinch-hit for before appearing in the game). Both Freehan and Porter were good hitters - not merely good hitters "for a catcher" - with above-average OBP and SLG (.354/.409 for Porter vs. park-adjusted league-averages of .329/.388; .340/.412 for Freehan vs. .325/.382).

Freehan was perhaps more celebrated defensively in his time, leading Porter 5-0 in Gold Gloves but in terms of value on the field, they were very close. Freehan threw out 37% of would-be basestealers for this career; Porter threw out 38%.

They were also both the regular catcher for one World Series winner - the 1982 Cardinals for Porter - although Porter also played for two other pennant winners.

Overall, very similar players statistically. To some extent, the biggest difference between the two is that Porter shared a league with better opposition catchers: most notably Hall-of-Famers Carlton Fisk and Gary Carter. This shows up in one of the bigger differences in their conventional records: Bill Freehan was named to 11 All-Star teams; Darrell Porter was named to 4.

Conclusion
So, do I think that Bill Freehan belongs in the Hall of Fame or not? I have mentioned in other articles that I think of myself as being a fairly big-Hall guy and that I prefer to evaluate players based on their strongest argument. If you can make a Hall-of-Fame case for a player that's stronger than "eh, if you tilt your head this way and ignore these three countervailing arguments, I guess I can see it", I'm inclined to support guys for the Hall of Fame.

Does Bill Freehan have such a case?

I think that he does. He really was the best catcher in the American League for a period of time that probably approaches a decade (at least 1964 - 1971) and was no worse than the second-best catcher in MLB over that time period. Based on context-neutral wins over positional average, I rank Bill Freehan as the best catcher in the major leagues at least three times - 1964, 1967, 1968, with an argument for a fourth (1971) - and in the conversation as the best catcher in the American League at least one more time (1969). There are players in general and probably catchers in particular that I would be inclined to put in my personal Hall of Fame before I got around to inducting Bill Freehan. But he had a solid major-league career and the Hall of Fame could do worse than inducting Bill Freehan.



All articles are written so that they pull data directly from the most recent version of the Player won-lost database. Hence, any numbers cited within these articles should automatically incorporate the most recent update to Player won-lost records. In some cases, however, the accompanying text may have been written based on previous versions of Player won-lost records. I apologize if this results in non-sensical text in any cases.

Home     List of Articles