Baseball Player Won-Loss Records
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Marty Marion

2016 Veterans' Committee HOF Ballot: Marty Marion

The Baseball Hall of Fame recently announced their 2016 Veterans' ballot for the Pre-Integration Era. The ballot includes 10 names, including "three executives and one of the game's earliest organizers". Player won-lost records don't really have anything to say about non-players. Player won-lost records also don't really have anything to say about players who played before 1921 (and relatively little to say about players who played before 1921). So, I don't really have anything to say about the non-players on the ballot or about 19th-century major-league players Bill Dahlen and Harry Stovey.

But I have calculated Player won-lost records for at least part of the careers of four of the candidates on the Pre-Integration ballot. This article looks at one of these players: former major-league shortstop Marty Marion. The first table below presents Marty Marion's career as measured by Player won-lost records. The records here have been extrapolated based on the games for which I have play-by-play data to estimate results for those games for which I do not have play-by-play data. The number of games actually played by Marty Marion are identified as "Total"; the number of games for which Player won-lost records are calculated are identified as "Known".

Marty Marion
Basic Player Won-Lost Records
Value Decomposition
Games
Season Team Age Total Known pWins pLosses pWin Pct. pWOPA pWORL eWins eLosses eWin Pct. eWOPA eWORL
1940SLN22125
125
14.314.70.4940.2
1.3
14.415.60.479-0.3
0.9
1941SLN23155
155
19.816.50.5461.9
3.4
19.320.40.486-0.4
1.3
1942SLN24147
147
19.115.50.5532.0
3.4
18.416.40.5301.3
2.6
1943SLN25129
129
16.013.50.5431.4
2.5
15.514.70.5140.5
1.7
1944SLN26144
144
19.415.50.5572.6
4.0
17.016.00.5151.1
2.4
1945SLN27123
123
15.913.60.5401.5
2.6
15.314.80.5090.6
1.7
1946SLN28146
146
18.116.40.5241.0
2.4
17.417.60.4970.1
1.5
1947SLN29149
149
18.618.30.5050.2
1.6
17.518.30.489-0.4
1.0
1948SLN30144
144
17.018.70.477-0.6
0.8
16.518.70.467-1.0
0.5
1949SLN31134
134
18.216.80.5200.9
2.3
15.516.50.485-0.3
1.0
1950SLN32106
106
12.512.40.5030.3
1.2
11.512.60.476-0.4
0.6
1952SLA3467
67
6.35.80.5210.3
0.8
5.96.10.491-0.0
0.4
1953SLA353
3
0.00.20.099-0.1
-0.1
0.00.30.074-0.1
-0.1
------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------
CAREER (reg. season) 1,572
1,572
195.5177.80.52411.5
26.4
184.3188.10.4950.615.6
------ ------ ------ ------ ------
PostSeason (career) 23
23
2.62.50.510 0.32.92.90.495 0.2
------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------
COMBINED 1,595
1,595
198.2180.30.524
26.7
187.1191.10.495 15.8


Overall, I am missing 0 games from Marty Marion's career.

Marty Marion was, by all accounts, a brilliant defensive shortstop who played for four National League pennant winners and three World Champions: the 1942, 1944, and 1946 St. Louis Cardinals.

Player won-lost records generally agree that Marty Marion was a very good fielder. The next table shows the top 25 players in net fielding wins at shortstop for whom I have calculated Player won-lost records. As in the above table, missing player games are extrapolated based on the games for which I do have play-by-play data.

Top 25 Fielding Shortstops
(missing player games extrapolated)
eWins eLosses eWinPct Net Wins
1Ozzie Smith118.1103.30.53314.8
2Pee Wee Reese88.176.40.53511.6
3Lou Boudreau71.760.10.54411.6
4Mark Belanger76.266.20.53510.0
5Cal Ripken92.584.40.5238.0
6Tim Foli67.160.40.5266.7
7Alan Trammell82.175.70.5206.4
8Dave Concepcion90.084.30.5165.7
9Omar Vizquel102.096.40.5145.7
10Eddie R. Miller71.465.80.5205.6
11Roy McMillan86.180.50.5175.5
12Rey Sanchez37.431.90.5405.5
13Phil Rizzuto68.763.20.5215.5
14Jack Wilson52.246.80.5275.4
15Bud Harrelson54.749.40.5265.3
16Garry Templeton84.579.30.5165.2
17Rabbit Maranville54.749.70.5245.0
18Marty Marion72.167.10.5185.0
19Andrelton Simmons30.125.20.5444.8
20Ron Hansen51.747.10.5234.6
21J.J. Hardy58.353.70.5214.6
22Ozzie Guillen72.067.50.5164.5
23Dal Maxvill46.041.50.5264.5
24Luis Aparicio111.0106.60.5104.5
25Tony Fernandez64.960.50.5184.4


Fielding Player won-lost records tend to become somewhat less accurate the farther back in time one goes. For example, for many games during Marion's career, the exact nature of many fielding outs are not specified - i.e., we know that a batter made an out, but we don't know if he grounded out to the shortstop (e.g., Marion) or flew out to the left fielder (e.g., Stan Musial). Because of this, Player fielding winning percentages have a tendency to be be closer to 0.500 the farther back in time one goes.

Probably because of this, there are only three players in the above table who were contemporaries of Marion (plus Marion himself, of course): Pee Wee Reese, Lou Boudreau, and Eddie Miller. It may also be worth noting that, coincidentally or not, Reese, Boudreau, and Miller played for the three teams for which Retrosheet has the most complete and generally most detailed play-by-play data over this time period, the Brooklyn Dodgers, Cleveland Indians, and Cincinnati Reds, respectively.

It is hard to precisely quantify just how good a defensive player was 70 years ago (heck, it can be hard to precisely quantify just how good a defensive player was three years ago). But the evidence would certainly seem to suggest that Marty Marion was one of the best fielding shortstops of his era.



All articles are written so that they pull data directly from the most recent version of the Player won-lost database. Hence, any numbers cited within these articles should automatically incorporate the most recent update to Player won-lost records. In some cases, however, the accompanying text may have been written based on previous versions of Player won-lost records. I apologize if this results in non-sensical text in any cases.

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